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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
I've been dealing with an issue with my driver side window. It will not roll up or down under its own power.
When I started dealing with issue I just figured I'd throw parts at it. I acquired a driver side window with regulator and power window master switch from a junkyard and installed them. Window still will not move.

I disassembled the window motor, cleaned the brushes and commutator, then I bench tested it with a battery and it worked fine. I then reinstalled it in the door and it doesn't work. While it is still installed in the door, I disconnected the power window motor plug and applied voltage and the window goes up and down.

I then measured voltage coming to the window motor plug on the car side and it works as it should, flip the window switch up +12v, switch down -12v. When I plug the wires back in to the car harness and use the switch the window doesn't move.

I had a thought that maybe the wires in the door frame may be frayed or broken hidden inside the insulation from years of open and shutting the door.

So I'm stumped. Any thoughts or suggestions?

Video of tests
Video of voltage applied:
 

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I had a thought that maybe the wires in the door frame may be frayed or broken hidden inside the insulation from years of open and shutting the door.
This is likely the explanation. There have been several such failures. I had one myself.

A tip on repair. You can snake repair wires through the rubber tube between the car and the door by soldering the repair wire to the end of a stiff piece of hardware utility wire:)
 

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I think your analysis might be correct. It looks like in your first video you read +/- 12V, but then plug in the motor and read nothing? That likely indicates a high-resistance connection somewhere, so when you put a load through the wires, the voltage drops. You could try measuring the resistance of the wires from the motor end to the window switch end.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
It was a lot more work than I wanted to do but I got it to WORK!!!

I had to remove the fender liner and remove the fender.
I ran new 18 ga wire from the switch, through the firewall rubber grommet, then flex tube in the door jam, then spliced it to the window motor plug on the car side.

It now works as it should.

Looks like it was just worn out wires in the door jam. I never thought open and shutting a door hundreds of times could of worn out a wire, but it did.

Thanks for all the suggestions.
 

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The door jam wiring issue happens a lot more than you may thing....a LOT more. Im gona go as far as saying its not a matter of "if" door jam wiring will fail as its a "when". Metal can only be bent so many times until its fractures. Wires are metal, thus it they will fracture with movement.

Also to build upon what Mario said: circuit issues relating to voltage drops is a very common issue with wire loom circuitry. The term for testing this is literally called performing a "voltage drop" test. For future reference when testing a typical 12 automotive system you can have a great power (12v) and ground (neg) at any given component with it disconnected but it lacks any ability to perform when connected is called voltage drop. The ONLY way to properly test for voltage drop is to LOAD the circuit with whatever component its connected to. A ohm test, or continuity test, can show very bad or obvious resistances in the circuit but the only true way is to connect everything and load that circuit with whatever procedure is the issue, in your case its rolling the window down/up. Instead of testing with your multimeter at the + and - of the circuit, go to the SAME SIDE of the circuit. In your case go the + (12v) of the connector at the regulator connector with one test lead, then goto the POS (+) terminal at your battery (or fuse that supplies the regulator power) with the other test lead. This WONT give you a 12 volts reading on your meter but rather it will show how much voltage is lost from the POS battery terminal to the POS connection at the connector. If its over 0.50v then that would be considered an excessive drop. I would bet money that your window regulator circuit was dropping significant, if not all, of its voltage. You can use this test to pinpoint where the voltage drop is occurring but moving the test lead closer and closer to the connector until you read as close to zero voltage drop as you can. If you test 0 volts being dropped from battery to the door jam but 10 volts from door jam to connector then you could relatively assume the issue is between the area where the drop disappeared. Do this with the ground side as well to fully test the circuit.

I know thats lengthy but that voltage drop in a nutshell. You can always use google and youtube to explain it better and in more depth. Corrosion in wiring, breaks, and opens are all voltage drops.

I cant stress enough how important voltage drop tests are. I can tell you the vast majority of people i know, dont do voltage drop tests (or know what they are).
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Thank you for your insight JuicyBait. I had a "light bulb" moment when you said test the voltage drop at different points along the circuit. I wish I would of thought of that sooner, would of saved me a day trip to the junkyard.

I guess every problem is just another learning experience for next time.
Thanks again.
 

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2001 5S "Turbo"
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RR2005
Please include your Location in your Profile, as ALL G1 Insighters have done. Thank You.
 

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I hope you took photos. I have the same problem with my Silver 2000. Swapped switches, and motor. I knew it was the door cabling, but couldn’t see a way to start to trace that path. I just avoided the drive thru, probably a good thing.
 
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