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I have a 2001 CVT Insight with 150k miles, that I bought new in 2001. The hybrid battery has only shown less than 50% charge briefly, approx 10 years ago, then it went back up to 95% at the time. Since then it has slowly dropped from 95% to approx 60% this past year. I took the car to Honda because my check engine light wouldn't go off after tightening the gas cap repeatedly and the codes were P1259 [vtec pressure switch] and P1166 [O2 sensor]. My husband was going to replace the parts, but on my way home the car jerked, the IMA light came on & my charge went to 100%. I have several questions-
1] should I drive with the IMA light on? I don't want to ruin the hybrid battery, but I'll need to take to Honda to get the code
2] Is a 15 year old battery up to being recharged/conditioned for the first time?

I'd rather not spend the $250-300 on the harness & equipment if I'm only going to get 6 months of driving out of it.

Thanks!
 

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1) Yes. You can get the basic codes read at any auto parts store, and you can flash the codes yourself:

http://99mpg.com/categories/insight/readingtheblinkcod/

The only thing that's really an issue is if the red 12V battery light comes on. When that illuminates, the 12V is not being charged, and you'll end up stranded when the 12V depletes.

2) Do this:

Disconnect the 12V
Wait 30 seconds
Connect the 12V
Start and rev the car to 3500rpm until the battery reads full.
Remove the IPU lid, Steps 1-9:

https://hybridautomotive.com/pages/install-i1.html

Allow the car to sit overnight.

Without unplugging the grey connector plugged into the left box in step 13, probe the tap voltages and record them (picture inverted to represent the orientation of the plug):



If those 10 voltages are within 0.2V, VERY good chance of getting more life with a Hybrid Automotive grid charger/discharger kit.

If they are 0.4V, it's a decent chance.

If they are more than 0.6V, it's a poor chance.

These are not HA recommendations. They are based on my own observations.

EDIT: If the pack has been grid charged, and they are not within 0.1V of each other - probably have one or more failed cells/sticks.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Thanks for the reply- I drove to an auto store to have the code read. The SOC was at 1 bar the entire 10 minute trip and it never tried to charge, even when coasting. The read code was 1449, when I got home & looked up the code, I see there should have been a subcode also, which I did not get.

We'll try #2 this weekend.
 

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The most common P1449 is (78 ). You can get it via the blink codes method above to confirm.

Whatever the case, P1449 in all its forms is the most damning code for a battery.

Hmmm... Willie must be sleeping...

It might be to your advantage to edit your profile to indicate your location in case there's a fellow Insighter near you that can help.
 

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Before you try #2, try what Steve suggested in #1 for the link to 99mpg.com, that will show you how to 'blink out' the subcode.

If you pull the 12v neg lead, the code will be erased until the trouble comes back.
 

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Thanks for the reply- I drove to an auto store to have the code read. The SOC was at 1 bar the entire 10 minute trip and it never tried to charge, even when coasting. The read code was 1449, when I got home & looked up the code, I see there should have been a subcode also, which I did not get.

We'll try #2 this weekend.
You might not see the green charge bars while the battery is being charged after resetting the SOC by disconnecting the 12 volt battery negative lead.

The first few SOC bars take awhile to light up and advance 1/2 way up the SOC display. As you drive the bars may seem to not be advancing but they will suddenly go to the top of the display. It may take more than 10 miles to fully charge the battery.

If you put your location and some info about your Insight in the signature line it would help. There might be a forum member near you that could help you out.
 

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https://hybridautomotive.com/pages/install-i1.html

Allow the car to sit overnight.

Without unplugging the grey connector plugged into the left box in step 13, probe the tap voltages and record them (picture inverted to represent the orientation of the plug):



If those 10 voltages are within 0.2V, VERY good chance of getting more life with a Hybrid Automotive grid charger/discharger kit.

If they are 0.4V, it's a decent chance.

If they are more than 0.6V, it's a poor chance.

These are not HA recommendations. They are based on my own observations.
Does this pin out also apply to HCH1 connector? There are 10 voltages being read here, so each measurement is for 2 sticks and should be around 16V?
 

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Does this pin out also apply to HCH1 connector? There are 10 voltages being read here, so each measurement is for 2 sticks and should be around 16V?
Dunno. Never tried to match them up. Here's HCH1:

 

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1) Yes. You can get the basic codes read at any auto parts store, and you can flash the codes yourself:

Reading the blink codes - MIMA Honda Insight Modified Integrated Motor Assist

The only thing that's really an issue is if the red 12V battery light comes on. When that illuminates, the 12V is not being charged, and you'll end up stranded when the 12V depletes.

2) Do this:

Disconnect the 12V
Wait 30 seconds
Connect the 12V
Start and rev the car to 3500rpm until the battery reads full.
Remove the IPU lid, Steps 1-9:

https://hybridautomotive.com/pages/install-i1.html

Allow the car to sit overnight.

Without unplugging the grey connector plugged into the left box in step 13, probe the tap voltages and record them (picture inverted to represent the orientation of the plug):



If those 10 voltages are within 0.2V, VERY good chance of getting more life with a Hybrid Automotive grid charger/discharger kit.

If they are 0.4V, it's a decent chance.

If they are more than 0.6V, it's a poor chance.

These are not HA recommendations. They are based on my own observations.

Okay....I got my tap voltages and have found my culprits....where can I find out which stick pair corresponds to which tap voltages, ie my C20 + C7 are way lower than the rest. All were 15.51V to 15.80V volts except those, which were at 14.49V
Thanks:cool:
 

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Okay....I got my tap voltages and have found my culprits....where can I find out which stick pair corresponds to which tap voltages, ie my C20 + C7 are way lower than the rest. All were 15.51V to 15.80V volts except those, which were at 14.49V
Thanks:cool:
That has been posted on here before, but it's not really important. When you have removed the junction board and the translucent cover at the other end, you will have access to all 20 stick ends and can check individual sticks.

Additionally, your assumption that pairs as low as 15.51V are okay is incorrect. Truly healthy pairs will be within 0.1V, so I suggest you list all those pairs and scrutinize anything outside a 0.1V range pair-wise and even extend that to individual sticks - narrow the range to 0.05V once you're actually in the pack.
 

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that has been posted on here before, but it's not really important. When you have removed the junction board and the translucent cover at the other end, you will have access to all 20 stick ends and can check individual sticks.

Additionally, your assumption that pairs as low as 15.51v are okay is incorrect. Truly healthy pairs will be within 0.1v, so i suggest you list all those pairs and scrutinize anything outside a 0.1v range pair-wise and even extend that to individual sticks - narrow the range to 0.05v once you're actually in the pack.
c9 & c20 = 15.80
c20 & c7 = 14.49
c7 & c18 = 15.76
c18 & c5 = 15.78
c16 & c15 = 15.73
c15 & c14 = 15.77
c14 & c13 = 15.71
c13 & c12 = 15.66
c12 & c11 = 15.51
c11 & c10 = 15.78
 

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c9 & c20 = 15.80
c20 & c7 = 14.49
c7 & c18 = 15.76
c18 & c5 = 15.78
c16 & c15 = 15.73
c15 & c14 = 15.77
c14 & c13 = 15.71
c13 & c12 = 15.66
c12 & c11 = 15.51
c11 & c10 = 15.78
See how 7 are pretty tight around 15.71-15.80, 0.09V total?

When you crack the pack open, look for any sticks outside a .05V range, and you'll find the likely problem children.

Note that this method provides no guarantees; however, in the absence of additional testing (capacity, iR and SD), it's better than nothing.

Lastly, there's the challenge of obtaining good replacement sticks.
 
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