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Discussion Starter #1
Just wondering if anyone has had any success restoring the appearance of the rear spoiler? The clear coat is often peeling. I wonder if the clear coat could be stripped off and then the hard black plastic base material could be buffed out to a nice shine?
 

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I ended up replacing mine, but the outside corners and tabs were broken, too. Doggone thing rattled like an old Ford pickup!
 

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Just wondering if anyone has had any success restoring the appearance of the rear spoiler? The clear coat is often peeling. I wonder if the clear coat could be stripped off and then the hard black plastic base material could be buffed out to a nice shine?
I did this to a center section of my spoiler, where the paint was peeling and bubbling. I'll try to remember to take a pic and post it. It's definitely doable, but a bit tricky. The plastic underneath the paint can be buffed to a shine, not as shiny/glossy as the paint, but pretty decent... Can't remember what I used or did to do it. I probably used paint thinner, a plastic scraper, and a microfiber cloth to remove the old finish, and then probably used Novus plastic polish to buff by hand. The plastic scratches very easily and the scratches show up very noticeably - so you have to be careful if you want a decent finish... Also, note that it's black gloss paint, I guess with a clear coat, not just clear coat over black plastic...
 

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Plastidip looks great, but only looks great for a year or so.
 

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Here's one image, that's all the room I have left in the 'gallery' to post. Kind of hard to get a clear sense of the quality with only one image though... You can see the reflections in the part of the spoiler I refinished vs. OEM finish vs. the hatch glass to get a sense of the finish...



Thinking about it more, I recall I did at least start by using a drill with one of those sort of cloth/abrasive wheels on the end, to remove the paint. And as I recall, it ended up putting scratches in the plastic that were too deep to easily buff-out. From a few feet back you can't see them, but standing right above you can.

In general, the plastic underneath the paint has or can have a finish that more or less matches the air foil on the bottom of the bumper cover. I suppose it can have even a glossier finish, depending on how careful you are with the paint removal and buffing... Basically, I don't think you can use any mechanical method to remove the paint and then end up with a relatively easy time buffing and getting a good finish. I think that's why I was thinking 'paint thinner, plastic scraper, and cloth' above - not what I used, but what I concluded I probably should have used... I don't know if this is the way to go, but something like this, maybe a different more appropriate solvent, would be - something that will allow you to more or less rub and lightly flat-scrape the paint off, rather than something that will dig into the plastic and scratch...
 

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I'd suggest checking out "Sweet Project Cars" on YouTube. From what I have seen of his ideas you should be able to use Mother's Aluminum and Chrome polish with a buffer or a drill-mounted buffer to get a shine on it. The same stuff works on headlights to buff out the foggy discoloration and leaves the headlight sparkling clean and no scratches. And it will not harm your paint.

I'll bet there is some rattle can clear coat.

Here is what HomeDepot offers, and I am sure there are others: https://www.homedepot.com/s/clear%20coat?NCNI-5
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Maybe a person could start with very fine wet sand paper to remove the peeling clear coat and then find a suitable polish to use with a buffing wheel. I am looking forward to giving it a try in the not too distant future. Any additional ideas are appreciated. Blessings to you all.
 

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I think the most important thing is simply getting the paint off as clean as possible, however you do it, that's key. Polishing the plastic to a nice finish is no big deal - if you don't scratch the plastic too much and/or too deeply while removing the paint. Wet sanding with really fine sand paper would probably work, but it seems like it'd be a major pain to do, take a long time. I wish I remember what I did a bit better. I seem to recall it ended up being easier and more effective to scrape and flake the paint off rather than trying to abrade it off (like with sand paper or whatever). Paint usually doesn't adhere too well to plastics in the first place, so once you get going, like starting with portions that are already messed up, you can kind of work the paint off in flakes, more peeling-like rather than wearing down-like through the paint with an abrasive.
 

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^I didn't see any videos there about how to remove paint and clear coat from plastic, particularly in a way that minimizes damage to the plastic surface so that you can easily buff it out and get a good finish... Probably some useful info there, but I personally wouldn't want to sift through all that stuff to find info relevant to this problem.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Good idea to try to scrape off carefully as long as the scraper does not dig in to the plastic. It is really only the up-facing surface that is peeling. Sweet project cars site looks very interesting -i have to check it out regarding the rim clear coat renewal too. Thanks much!
 
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