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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Today did a panic stop and blew out a brake line in the engine compartment up against the firewall, underneath the 12V battery. Made it home (less than a mile of easy backroads) using gentle braking and e-brake.

I've know for several years that my brake lines where rusting all over the vehicle due to New England road salt. I'd been putting it out of my mind.

Realistically to keep the car on the road I should replace every hard and soft brake line in the vehicle. I'm mechanically literate, but it seems like a lot of work for a nearly 20 year old car. My gut feeling is that this is the push I need to move into something a little more modern and maybe plug-in. I've owner this car for 8 years, paid $3500 for it in 2011, so I don't feel it owes me anything. Otherwise it is still mechanically sound, engine and transmission are good, AC works, etc, new BumbleBee battery 3 years ago.

I'm willing to be talked out of it, particularly if someone has done the job of replacing all the brake lines and has some insight (haha) into how difficult it is.
 

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Good luck
willie
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Site rules indicate a price has to be indicated.
Search function will show numerous threads about replacing brake lines.
Use the custom search function top left of this page.
Good uck
willie
Hah, I wasn't offering it for sale! Most likely donate.

I've read threads on brake line replacement and didn't really get a good feel for how long it would take to do everything. Seems to be some people who make and flare their own, some use stainless kits, some use Honda, etc. Really seems like a lot of work and a real pain, drop the gas tank, deal with rusty hardware and clips etc. Back in the day when I was a starving college student would have probably launched right into it. Now I don't know.
 

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If you're done caring, you're done caring. Teh car though, seems like it would keep on going. I'm curious to see when something MAJOR fails on mine, so I plan on driving it until it blows up. Currently at 260k and runs perfect, it's my daily and my most dependable vehicle. I looked into Teslas, Volts, all sorts of things, but it's hard to top 55mpg at 75mph.
 

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Given your sig, and how you seem to like the car, I would consider pulling it into the garage and doing the work over time, setting aside a few hours each weekend and giving yourself a couple of months to get it done. With tall jack stands and not being in a rush, it won't be so bad. A few months driving something else will be a nice break and making getting it going again fun.

My teenager always wants to drive mine, is smart enough to listen for changes in sounds that mean a repair should be done before something breaks in an expensive way, and is resourceful and confident enough to fix them (she does her mom's brakes, oil changes, ripped out an entire dash in to replace an AC evaporator, can borrow Dad's tools, and Dad has a flaring tool and a brake line bender). So if you are ready to part with it, I know someone who would be really happy to get it.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Thanks for the input guys. After sleeping on it, and getting the car up on jackstands and carefully examining and tracing each line, I decided the job isn't as daunting as I originally feared. I plan to take my time with it and replace every brake line and fuel line for good measure and keep the car going. In some ways doing it all at once makes it much easier because I can be destructive taking the old rusty hardware off. I'm going to use stainless lines for the hard brake lines and Honda for everything else. (Except for one of the front rubber lines NLA but a Dorman replacement is available)

This vehicle is somewhat of a conundrum because in New England the car certainly degrades but it doesn't fall to pieces like most cars do up here. Everything is basically fixable for a lot less money than getting a different car, so logically you keep going but at some point you're driving a very old and somewhat tired car and questioning how you got there. But at least it I keep it going someone else can get cheap reliable transportation instead of sending it to the scrap heap.
 

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My teenage daughter always wants to drive mine, is smart enough to listen for changes in sounds that mean a repair should be done before something breaks in an expensive way, and is resourceful and confident enough to fix them (she does her mom's brakes, oil changes, ripped out an entire dash in to replace an AC evaporator, can borrow Dad's tools, and Dad has a flaring tool and a brake line bender). So if you are ready to part with it, I know someone who would be really happy to get it.
Sounds like my daughter who built her own race engines, then went out and trounced a bunch of guys. I used to tell her that she was as smart as the guys who designed it, so dig in. Lots of gals have the talent;)
 

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...so logically you keep going but at some point you're driving a very old and somewhat tired car and questioning how you got there.
I was once commenting on the cost of keeping old boats in the water and a cousin (who repaired both boats and cars) said this: "Cars and boats are like marriages. You can keep all three running forever if you’re willing to put the money, time, and effort into them."

As an aside... He owned no old cars, no boats, and was divorced!
 

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Thanks for the input guys. After sleeping on it, and getting the car up on jackstands and carefully examining and tracing each line, I decided the job isn't as daunting as I originally feared. I plan to take my time with it and replace every brake line and fuel line for good measure and keep the car going. In some ways doing it all at once makes it much easier because I can be destructive taking the old rusty hardware off. I'm going to use stainless lines for the hard brake lines and Honda for everything else. (Except for one of the front rubber lines NLA but a Dorman replacement is available)

This vehicle is somewhat of a conundrum because in New England the car certainly degrades but it doesn't fall to pieces like most cars do up here. Everything is basically fixable for a lot less money than getting a different car, so logically you keep going but at some point you're driving a very old and somewhat tired car and questioning how you got there. But at least it I keep it going someone else can get cheap reliable transportation instead of sending it to the scrap heap.
Awesome! Another car saved. I find this work very rewarding. I hope we'll see you at one of this summer's east coast events. It will be nice to hear how the repairs progress, if you decide to open a thread to document it (hint hint!)
 

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Discussion Starter #12
I was once commenting on the cost of keeping old boats in the water and a cousin (who repaired both boats and cars) said this: "Cars and boats are like marriages. You can keep all three running forever if you willing to put the money, time, and effort into them."

As an aside... He owned no old cars, no boats, and was divorced!
I think I'm a poster child for that since I keep multiple old cars, one old boat, and one old girlfriend around basically forever. Mostly I think it's just that the effort to keep the old ones seems less than the effort to get a new one! I hate shopping.

Actually Insights are a lot like boats in that aluminum and fiberglass basically last forever it's just that all the other parts still fail. They just don't all fail at once, so it's easy to just keep fixing stuff as it comes up. Then you look back over time and realize you've replaced everything but the structural part.

There's an very old joke about a guy who set out to design a perfectly reliable carriage where every part is perfectly designed and no part would ever be the first to fail. Then one day he's riding down the road and the whole thing collapses into a heap of dust.
 

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