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A reputable company that may revolutionize batteries. I think already is revolutionizing batteries

https://youtu.be/hI4t61yvdLE
Interesting technology and apparently very promising. One does get the impression that batteries are close to a production breakthrough on several fronts.

Maybe we'll get some really attractive options before we lose all the Gen1s:)
 

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Having sold our Insight and now owning only a 2014 BMW i3 BEV, I monitor Websites devoted to EV's. Readers of these Websites are tiring of so many battery breakthrough claims with no commercially viable results so far. Developing a battery technology that is more energy-dense by mass and volume, less expensive, has more longevity, can be charged/discharged more rapidly, is safer, etc., than today's Li-ion battery cells is really difficult.

Our i3 uses Samsung battery cells, so this claim by a major player might be more credible than many.

Toyota is making claims about a solid-state battery cell that would likely leapfrog Samsung's graphene battery cell if it pans out. Tesla/Panasonic is continually improving its L:i-ion battery cells as well without leaping to a radical new technology.

Meanwhile, 3 years after our i3 was manufactured, Samsung commercialized a Li-ion cell that is 50% more energy-dense by volume than the cells in our i3 and which BMW uses in 2017 i3's. By the end of this year, Samsung will have commercialized a Li-ion cell that is again 50% more energy-dense by volume, or twice as energy-dense by volume as the cells in our i3 only 5 years after it was produced. BMW will use that cells in the 2019 i3 which should nearly double its range compared with our i3. Apparently more improvements to current Li-ion cell technology are expected, so while claims of wonderful new cell technologies abound, actual improvements are occurring at a fairly rapid pace.

By the time our battery warranty expires in 2022, I should be able to replace the cells in our i3's battery pack with Samsung cells that would more than double our current driving range. Whether doing so makes economic sense, especially since I rarely need twice the range, remains to be seen. Because the i3 has a battery pack with replaceable modules and electronics that can adapt to greater battery pack capacity, having the option to upgrade is nice, just as Insight owners have been able to upgrade the cells in their battery packs.

The Samsung graphene battery cell video touted being able to recharge an EV at home in an hour. That's generally unnecessary and is really impractical due to the electrical power that would be required and that most homes would not have available. But it would be wonderful for long-distance travel because rapidly recharging an EV could become similar to refueling an ICE vehicle. However, an EV charging site similar to a service station of today would require a huge power connection to the electricity grid and/or would require a large, expensive battery system to help level out electricity power demands.

So widespread EV acceptance still has challenges that must be solved, but these challenges are solvable.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Yes true but once the quick chatging problem is solved in such a way it is practical for long distance travel ( lets say less than 30 minutes for an 80% charge) and simultaneously the cost per capacity goes down we will see an EV explosion which is why i invested in lithium etf stock
 
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