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Discussion Starter #1
Santa was nice enough to leave a ScanGauge in my stocking this Christmas. However, I got it hooked up, and then discovered that it apparently doesn't read a lot of the codes without programming. Has anyone figured out how to do this? I haven't been able to find much, either here or on the web.

I'd like to get IMA stuff, of course, and also codes from the ABS system.
 

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IIRC the only scan tools that will read Honda propritary codes (non OBDII, OBDII codes are in the public domain) are the Honda scan tools (HDS, PC or pocket PC based software). Starting at 8x the cost of your very nice ScanGauge. :shock: Plus an annual upgrade fee as the codes grow / change. :|

Don't feel too bad I don't have one either.

The data from the IMA pack would be the most interesting. IIRC some of it is available thru the Honda scan tool (HDS).

IMA codes etc., can still be "blinked" but without freeze frame data that is sometimes nice for diagnosis.

HTH! :)
 

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code reading devices

hi guys,

great thread! i have had two check engine lights in my 14k miles with my baby (2000 model), and the first was an oxygen sensor, and based on my research from these forums, i had them clear the code and drove another 10k miles no problems! but the light has returned, and i'd like to

1) confirm my suspicion that it it the o2 sensor (as the car is running smoothly)

2) clear the code and get that light off!

so i put to you all the question, can i accomplish 1 and 2 with a "scanguage"?
or just 2? or neither? i might go see if my dealer can give me some sympathy since as the other forum says, ' a fix is in the works" for this recurrent code.

thanks!
 

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Re: code reading devices

skinnypilot said:
so i put to you all the question, can i accomplish 1 and 2 with a "scanguage"?
Yes, or any other code reader. And there is software & cables available for Palm or PocketPC's that can do the same. Correctly "interpreting" the codes is where the real skill comes in (freeze frame data can make or break the diagnosis) and _some_ O2 sensor codes are the hardest to correctly diagnose.

The codes (without freeze frame data. Requires a scan tool with the capability, not all do) can be blinked by shorting the _correct_ 2 pins in the OBDII connector. The "SCS" & a ground pin. But beware there is 12v present on at least 1 pin and DATA pins that come from the computer

12V :arrow: DATA may = smoke & :cry:

Disconnecting the 12v battery clears any codes present.

HTH! :)
 

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batt disconnect

thanks john,

it sounds like 12 v batt disconnect is the way to go...

this begs the question, other than resetting my radio clock and presets, and my MPG data (i'm guessing), is there any other harm in unplugging my 12v battery? such as confusing my stock security system, etc?
 

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Re: batt disconnect

skinnypilot said:
it sounds like 12 v batt disconnect is the way to go...
Well, without retrieving the code you won't know if its another O2 sensor code or something completely different. You will also cause an IMA reset and must "recharge" the 144v pack to "full".

But no MPG data is not lost via this method.

IMO its not the "way to go". The "cheapest" is to make a OBDII plug to do the SCS :arrow: Ground and get the code via blinks. Then reset by disconnecting the 12v to the PCM (I'd have to look up the fuse location and number). AFAIK the blink codes are only published next to their OBDII counterparts in the Factory Service manual.

But "advanced" diagnosis, the kind that O2 sensors sometimes _require_ demands a scan tool with freeze frame data capability and data stream interpretation (live O2 sensor data during a road test). The ScanGauge (and others) are the tools for the job.

If your gonna start "playing" mechanic you'll have to buy the book. IIRC a "cheap" modifiable OBDII connector for a scan tool is available etail for around $25. Google is your friend. The factory Service manual (the Factory ETM is a good companion too) come up regularly on eBay for 50-75$.

Happy bidding & hunting :!: :)

Sincerely,
 

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Re: batt disconnect

Insightful Trekker said:
skinnypilot said:
it sounds like 12 v batt disconnect is the way to go...
The "cheapest" is to make a OBDII plug to do the SCS :arrow: Ground and get the code via blinks. Then reset by disconnecting the 12v to the PCM (I'd have to look up the fuse location and number). AFAIK the blink codes are only published next to their OBDII counterparts in the Factory Service manual.

But "advanced" diagnosis, the kind that O2 sensors sometimes _require_ demands a scan tool with freeze frame data capability and data stream interpretation (live O2 sensor data during a road test). The ScanGauge (and others) are the tools for the job.

IIRC a "cheap" modifiable OBDII connector for a scan tool is available etail for around $25.
I understand most of that, and I have the FSM, so I'll try the blink method. Do I understand correctly that I need a ScanGuage, and an OBDII connector? With some clever wiring, I will be counting blinks and cross referencing the FSM, confirming the anticipated code, and then pulling the fuse corresponding to the PCM for reset? Sounds like a fun afternoon for an insight geek.
 

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Re: batt disconnect

skinnypilot said:
Do I understand correctly that I need a ScanGuage, and an OBDII connector?
Huh :?: :? Re-read my eariler replies.
(there are several good O2 sensor threads too, use the forum search feature)

To simply "blink" and clear a code, no. In "theory" you could use a paper clip to cross connect the 2 (correctly selected as specified above) pins in the OBDII connector. Just don't oops :!: :oops: And there are several _overlapping_ blink codes that correspond to _different_ more specific OBDII counterparts. So IMO you can be starting the repair "crippled" if you don't have the right tools for the job.

It depends on where the diagnosis leads based on the code, its frequency of recurrance. live sensor data, freeze frame data, and in some cases sensor failure verification (in that order, you can't take all codes at face value).

A "simple" code P1456, "Evap system leak, fuel tank area" repair difficulty is multiplied by its generalized blink code "90", Evap system leak. With a code 90 you don't know what end of the car to start on. With a 1456 check that the fuel cap is in good condition, seals well, and does _not_ nudge tighter before it "clicks". Obviously if it was "loose" there's your leak. Clear the code, drive it 2 "drive cycles" (2 normal commute days for most people) and if the code dosen't recurr your done :!: Obviously a 1456 _could_ also include other fuel vapor leaks, but in general will be limited to the fuel tank area.

Specifically its _how_ and _which_ senor has "failed" that will determine just how far you have to go down the list. And how complex the diagnosis may become.

Without the advanced tools and experience you may hit a dead end rather quickly. It all depends of the specifics. IMO in general O2 sensor diagnosis is one of the more difficult. And the Insight's LAF type O2 sensor further compounds the task.

OK now if your gonna take on this task do your homework (read some of the related threads in here, and your FSM ;) ). Then post a follow-up question or two that's more specific and built on your new knowledge base. :)

HTH! :)
 

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just don't forget that when you reset the BCM after disconnecting the battery, YOU MUST hold RPMs at about 3500 until battery monitor finishes recalibrating- if you don't IMA system will run about 10 volts low in all ranges
DON'T just let it idle- you'll lose a bunch of your power if you let it resets too low
if you do, disconnect battery and do it over - you'll feel the difference
 
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