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Discussion Starter #1
I'm wondering if the Insight's problem of bottoming out the rear suspension on bumps could be solved with aftermarket shock absorbers. Are any available?

Also, what is the typical lifespan of the OEM shocks on the Insight? I have a hard time thinking they would wear out in 60k on such a light car, but mine seem really soft. Maybe they started out that way.
 

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They where already soft. The rear does not weigh much. MAybe you where implying the "coil over shock" versions that add a coil over the shock absorber to help control the height
 

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alternative shock absorbers?

(I tried searching and didn't find any posts that directly addressed the question. This discussion was one of the closest).

I just got the bad news that one of my rear shocks is on its death bed (92,000 miles, lots of it at max weight and on bumpy city roads, so I guess it's finally time).

The dealer wants about $500 to do the shocks (they'd do both). Looking at parts prices, the "list" seems to be $175 each, with Majestic [a] offering them at about $130. So.. the $500 is a bit high, but reasonably in line. Uggh.

I'd guess that any competent indy shop, once theyve got the shocks, could handle the work, which would save me a bundle. (As much as I like the dealership I've got to be a bit thrifty).

Has anyone found a good replacement for the Honda OEM units? Thanks.

[a] http://www.hondaautomotiveparts.com/aut ... K+ABSORBER
 

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Re: alternative shock absorbers?

dberns said:
(I tried searching and didn't find any posts that directly addressed the question. This discussion was one of the closest).
Wow :!: Thanks for the "effort" in trying to find a preexisting on topic thread. But in such cases, when the choice is to revive a 27 month old post only partially on topic vs. a new one, new is probably a better choice.

AFAIK OEM Honda are the only available. And I'd expect a small amount of your extra expense is in the additional hardware that is probably showing quite a bit of salt corrosion and will need replacement. So if you choose an aftermarket shop get them the required bolts too. :)

Tried googling the shocks :?:

HTH! :)
 

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Are the OE units still the only ones available to us? I could not find any aftermarket Monroe, etc on any of my usual online spots (Shock warehouse, Tire rack, Shox)...
 

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i have a set of koni struts and shocks for the insight. i havent installed them yet. you can order them from pro parts usa in CA.
 

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i bought them from a member on here. i believe they were $1500 for all four. they are Single adujustable fronts, and double adjustable rears. they are meant for racing.
 

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(I tried searching and didn't find any posts that directly addressed the question. This discussion was one of the closest).

I just got the bad news that one of my rear shocks is on its death bed (92,000 miles, lots of it at max weight and on bumpy city roads, so I guess it's finally time).

The dealer wants about $500 to do the shocks (they'd do both). Looking at parts prices, the "list" seems to be $175 each, with Majestic [a] offering them at about $130. So.. the $500 is a bit high, but reasonably in line. Uggh.

I'd guess that any competent indy shop, once theyve got the shocks, could handle the work, which would save me a bundle. (As much as I like the dealership I've got to be a bit thrifty).

Has anyone found a good replacement for the Honda OEM units? Thanks.

[a] http://www.hondaautomotiveparts.com/aut ... K+ABSORBER
There is another way to solve this...

If you are handy with an electric drill and are not afraid to drill a small 1/8 inch hole about one inch down from the top of the main shock body, then I may be able to save you some cash.

The following approach has been done on numerous vehicles with good success.

1) Jack up the car and remove the wheel/tire
2) Find the location on the shock body that is thinner just below the welded area
3) Drill an 1/8 inch access hole here
4) Take your choice of "super expensive shock oils" and fill up
5) Remount the tire and drop the wheel back on the ground
6) Bounce on the shock as hard as you dare to remove excess oil
7) Jack back up and seal the hole with a small piece of inner tube and a worm gear hose clamp

The shock is now ready for another 50,000 miles or so, until this latest fix slowly wicks away again.

Jim.
 

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I've been thinking about doing this to my rear shocks, but a few questions

are the rear shocks gas filled?
How do you know exacly where to drill?
What if the metal fillings that come from drilling go inside the shock?
Wont the new oil leak out anyway if the seals in the shock are bad?


There is another way to solve this...

If you are handy with an electric drill and are not afraid to drill a small 1/8 inch hole about one inch down from the top of the main shock body, then I may be able to save you some cash.

The following approach has been done on numerous vehicles with good success.

1) Jack up the car and remove the wheel/tire
2) Find the location on the shock body that is thinner just below the welded area
3) Drill an 1/8 inch access hole here
4) Take your choice of "super expensive shock oils" and fill up
5) Remount the tire and drop the wheel back on the ground
6) Bounce on the shock as hard as you dare to remove excess oil
7) Jack back up and seal the hole with a small piece of inner tube and a worm gear hose clamp

The shock is now ready for another 50,000 miles or so, until this latest fix slowly wicks away again.

Jim.
 

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I've been thinking about doing this to my rear shocks, but a few questions

are the rear shocks gas filled?
How do you know exacly where to drill?
What if the metal fillings that come from drilling go inside the shock?
Wont the new oil leak out anyway if the seals in the shock are bad?
Hi,

>>are the rear shocks gas filled?
Don't know!!

>>How do you know exacly where to drill?
On the shocks that I have examined, there is typically a thick collar that is welded to the top of the cylindrical shock tube. Look for the welded area and drill just below that. The idea is to keep the hole high enough to make it hard for oil inside to get out, yet low enough not to drill into the collar.

>>What if the metal fillings that come from drilling go inside the shock?
I used axle grease on the drill bit, and went slow as to keep drill chips from getting in. This is especially true just before the drill bit breaks through the hole.

>>Wont the new oil leak out anyway if the seals in the shock are bad?
Sure, the oil will continue to seep out of the shock. But I have found that this may take several years before you have to refill again.

I think on the Cavalier, they were refilled about once every 18 months, and worked great.

Certainly cheaper than buying new shocks.

Jim.
 

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To prevent bottoming out... many times people have put rubber stoppers in.

Also the springs can be replaced:

Custom:
viewtopic.php?f=4&t=6860&p=60548&hilit=custom+spring#p60548

or Daewoo Matiz rear springs:
viewtopic.php?f=4&t=5549&p=51649&hilit=custom+spring#p51649

A complete replacement was planed by liveforphysics:
viewtopic.php?f=4&t=6645&p=58585&hilit=+shocks#p58585

The shocks themselves I have not read much about that I recall at the moment.
Hey thanks alot for those links
 
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