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People talk about how they get 60+ mpg all day long. I just took a trip and drove 1500 miles and got 52mpg. I kept my speed around 72 mph. What should i look at first to see if anything is wrong or to improve the situation?
 

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Its a combination of aero mods and driving skills. :D
i'm starting to wonder if people reporting higher mpgs live in places where you have a constant tailwind and go down hill both ways...
 

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No, not at all. Ask JimE where I live its up hill both ways, seriously.

Ive met gen 1 owners who get 40 mpg or 100+. Ive been at both ends of the scale too with a gen 2 insight.

Blocking off your lower grill is a big start. Getting one of those meters from Eli, Peter, etc tells you more of what your car is doing and when its in lean burn. You can be in lean burn in any gear, not just 5th. You can use lean burn in a modified form of pulse and glide staying in lean burn on the glide part.
 

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Speed is the absolute biggest factor in your MPG. Your tires and tire pressure are probably next. If you have the original RE92s, there are many members here that keep them at 45psi or even more. I'd say put 44 in the front and 42 in the back, depending on weather conditions.

Where you live makes a big difference, especially warm weather. I notice that when I go to work even a bit later in the day, say around noon instead of 10am, I get slightly better mileage. The Insight likes warm weather in general.

Drafting behind large vehicles can net you a few MPG (make sure you stay safe distance away - you get a big benefit even 150ft+ away).

Hills matter a little, though I'm guessing not too much since you get back a lot of the energy when you go down the other side.

With practice you get better mileage, too. You just learn to drive the car. When I first got the car five months ago, I would struggle to keep it above 50, so practice does make proficiency.

I have to drive a total of 40 miles a day for work, and I usually get 52-58 mpg on a normal day. I usually drive around 65-70. If I want to slow down to 60 or so, I can get a 60mpg average.

Besides, even at the lower end of the spectrum, you're still getting better mileage than 90% of the cars out there. 52mpg isn't bad by any measure, though it can seem so compared to what the car is capable of.
 

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People talk about how they get 60+ mpg all day long. I just took a trip and drove 1500 miles and got 52mpg. I kept my speed around 72 mph. What should i look at first to see if anything is wrong or to improve the situation?

With an insight in good shape 60 mpg is not a problem at all .

High speeds, AC use and bad IMA or 12V battery are killing the mpg
I keep my speed about 80 mph now and get only 47mpg.


when I drove about 45-50 mph and tried to stay in lean burn most of the time I got 70mpg average for 2011 over 15k miles. i had a tank at 80 and many tanks ~ 75 mpg average. Best 52 mile round trip was 96 mpg.

There are many small and big things you can learn from reading here , unfortunately it takes time...
 

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People talk about how they get 60+ mpg all day long. I just took a trip and drove 1500 miles and got 52mpg. I kept my speed around 72 mph. What should i look at first to see if anything is wrong or to improve the situation?
Slow down. As slippery as the Insight is, the drag at that speed is going to be tremendous. I second what Cobb said about the OBDII C&C gauge/meter. Feedback is golden for being able to stay in lean burn. I have also done the the modified pulse and glide Cobb mentioned. I accelerate at 70-75 mpg in lean burn up to more than 65 mph then let the speed slowly drop back (modified glide) to 50-55 mph. While I'm in the "glide" mode the mpg gauge is well over 100 mpg for a couple of miles.
 

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People talk about how they get 60+ mpg all day long. I just took a trip and drove 1500 miles and got 52mpg. I kept my speed around 72 mph. What should i look at first to see if anything is wrong or to improve the situation?
52mpg at 72 mph sounds about right to me, maybe a tad low. Anything over about 60mph kills mpg pretty quickly. Check tire pressure. Do you have a manual transmission? I can barely hold 75 mpg at 60 mph, in lean burn. With the inevitable hills and such on highways, this means I either have to let speed drop or hold speed yet lose fuel economy. 65 mph and I'm down to about 65-70 mpg. 70 mph and I'm probably down to 55-65 mpg.

So add your 2 mph (for 72), factor-in the losses from having to hold speed over hills or headwinds, etc., and probably the parts of the trip when you're not holding steady highway speeds, and you're down to about 52 mpg... I think the answer to your question is "no": at 72 mph 52 mpg is probably about all you should expect...
 

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i currently get 62-64 mpg on my stock with 50city/50 freeway driving G1 honda insight. 50psi tire pressure.

if i drove strictly on the side streets which sometimes i have to get to school, i average roughly 55-57mpg

i dont drive like a grandma either but do practice good driving habits.

on freeway speeds i travel mostly around 65-70mph

i noticed what kills mpg the most is the flow of traffic, side street driving, and a lot of short trips
 

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People talk about how they get 60+ mpg all day long. I just took a trip and drove 1500 miles and got 52mpg. I kept my speed around 72 mph. What should i look at first to see if anything is wrong or to improve the situation?
Speed, wind, temperature, tire inflation, mechanical condition, driving patterns. Seeing that you live in Kansas, which is not known for calm winds, and that middle America has not been exactly balmy lately, I'm thinking that you would easily have reached 60 mph if you had driven 62 instead of 72 mph, if it had been calm winds throughout your trip, and if it had been June instead of March. In terms of driving patterns, you also use extra fuel if you maintain a forced pace regardless of the grade. Bottom line, to get tremendous fuel economy you need to be at 100 mpg at least as long as you are at 20 mpg, or at 80 mpg at least as long as you are at 40 mpg. Thus, do your best to shorten periods of acceleration going up hills [let a little speed bleed off if necessary; you can make it up once you reach the top], and likewise do your best to milk the coast as you level out or go downhill.

All the above may sound like more trouble than it's worth, but it soon becomes second nature, and what else are you doing as you drive 1500 miles anyway?
 

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I've only had mine for a few weeks, but this is my experience:

Primary commute is 27 miles or so (all of the estimates to follow are also guesstimates). The commute is 90% rural highway (divided 4 lanes total, speed limit 55-60), 8% interstate (65mph), and 2% secondary/tertiary roads. The rural highway has moderate elevation changes, a few hills 500ft high, lots of 5-10% uphill/downhill grades, and rolling 50-100ft hills. Interstate is long slow grades up and down 500ft or so changes, and the other roads are rather hilly.

First week driving the car: I tried to maintain consistent speeds very close to the speed limit (60mph on highway, 70mph on interstate). Weather was fairly cold (30f when starting out). ~52mpg.

Second week driving the car: still targeted the same speeds, but slightly more willing to slow down going uphill, not necessarily downshifting, just "letting it roll". 30f starting temperature. ~56mpg

Third week driving the car: speed limits are general guidelines: +- 10-15% no big deal (pending traffic). Wherever/whenever possible, lightening how hard I push on the gas pedal to see if (1) car slows down, and (2) if fuel economy goes up. Proactively attempting to minimize pressure on gas pedal to the BARE MINIMUM to maintain approximate speed. When going down small hills, consciously maintaining a balance between maintaining speed and maximizing fuel economy (if you let off the gas pedal entirely, battery regen often kicks in and slows you down so just a touch of pedal is necessary). When going down big hills intentionally braking just enough to kick the regen to a higher level to prevent acceration and drive the SoC back up. Choosing to "brake" over a longer period of time for increased regen instead of actually using the brake pads leading up to a stop/turn (i.e. slowing over 500 feet instead of 100 feet). I've also found that following large trucks is beneficial because (1) nobody tailgates me, (2) semis frequently drive in the same way I am trying to, which makes it easier to stick with it, and (3) it helps fuel economy. Wind sucks and hurts fuel economy. Temperatures 30f-45f starting: 58-66mpg. Best yet was 66.2mpg, and I'm certain that I can do better as I learn the car and catch up on its maintenance.

Consistent driving characteristics: carrying speed through corners (as safely possible). Accelerating to SPEED LIMIT when merging into interstate traffic (leaving it in 2nd and flooring it). Not tailgating. Not allowing others to tailgate me. Getting away from erratic drivers (either slowing down to get away or passing them). Fuel economy gets massacred by folks that speed up and slow down in front of you for no reason (especially on an uphill). I've never understood why some folks MUST be pressing on the gas or brake pedal at all times, never just letting off the gas/brake and coasting...
 

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I love the long trips but they actually hurt my MPG's, Here in the SW all the speedlimits are 75 MPH, I try to keep it between 70-75 but other cars and still passing me like I'm standing still. Running at that speed I'm only seeing mid 50s MPG. When I'm driving around town and I can keep it at 60 or below I'm getting close to 70-74 MPG.

Summer in Phoenix is right around the corner, I'm expecting a 15-20 MPG hit as soon as I turn that AC button to on..... I hate summer!
 

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great info guys. thanks to everyone who responded. It looks like its mostly my driving. i am going to continue to mod the car to gain mpgs but i just don't think i can drive 60mph on a 550 miles trip. 8 hours is long enough!
 

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Thats the nice thing about owning a hybrid. You can burn the candle at both ends and still get better than average mpg.

great info guys. thanks to everyone who responded. It looks like its mostly my driving. i am going to continue to mod the car to gain mpgs but i just don't think i can drive 60mph on a 550 miles trip. 8 hours is long enough!
 

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People talk about how they get 60+ mpg all day long. I just took a trip and drove 1500 miles and got 52mpg. I kept my speed around 72 mph. What should i look at first to see if anything is wrong or to improve the situation?
That's about the MPG I got on a 1-way 2200 mile trip. This was, though, with the Insight loaded down with about 700lbs of belongings and going between 75 and 80mph, mostly flat out with the hammer down.
 

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People talk about how they get 60+ mpg all day long. I just took a trip and drove 1500 miles and got 52mpg. I kept my speed around 72 mph. What should i look at first to see if anything is wrong or to improve the situation?
72 mph is much faster than I ever drive my Insight. I would not expect to get decent mileage at that speed. I've found that if I keep it around 50-55 mine will get about 75 miles per gallon.
 

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People talk about how they get 60+ mpg all day long. I just took a trip and drove 1500 miles and got 52mpg. I kept my speed around 72 mph. What should i look at first to see if anything is wrong or to improve the situation?
SLOW DOWN!!

Is your car a MT or CVT? This is very important! The USA CVT model doesn't have lean burn.

If your car is a MT then what I've found with mine is that with the non Potenza tires I had that I usually can't keep the car in lean burn at 70 mph. At that point I would get about 60-65 mpg. Just below 70 mph I could get lean burn and ~70-75 mpg. Although one time a semi was passing me and while I was in the draft along side the truck I was going 72 mph and getting 120 mpg!!

The slower you drive the more mileage you'll get. I tend to drive at the speed limit to get good mileage. In my town the speed limit is 30 mph near my house. I can cruise at 30 mph in 4th gear and get 90 to 110 mpg. At a steady 45-48 mph I average 80 to 95 mpg with the wrong tires on the car.

The brand of tires is very important. I've been running Tempest 175/65-14 because that's what the car had on it when I bought it. One of the tires started acting up last week and I just put a set of RE92 Potenzas on the car.

On the way to the tire shop to mount/balance the tires I averaged 60 mpg in traffic. On the way home I averaged 69 mpg in even heavier traffic and the tires won't be broken in for ~500 miles. Then I can expect -more- mileage!!
 
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