Honda Insight Forum banner

1 - 16 of 16 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
92 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Rare, offbeat, nerdy, and DISCONTINUED!!! :shock: not that we didnt know this would happen.
I can just imagine it, the scene: at work, one worker says to another .... "don't look, but that Insight guy Griller is right over there, no no don't look! he'll come over and brag about his insane milage, it's a cult you know."

LOL, I have never owned a cult car before :lol:

Just for kicks today I tried to find out if there were more Dodge Vipers sold than Insights. I think in the U.S. there are more of the Vipers. Which of course makes the Insight that much more special.

But seriously if this doesn't make it offical I don't know what would. And it makes forums like this much more important.

[Mod - Please don't use capitals in the title in future]
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
224 Posts
Last year, just about this time in May, in the midst of a small flurry of publicity, I was asked in a radio interview if Insight owners were a "sort of cult". After a few fleeting thoughts about strange satanic rituals and motorcycle gangs, I realized that while Insight owners tend to be trend-setting, conscientious people, the "cult" label wasn't totally off the mark.
I knew that only a few sound bites from that interview would make it onto the air, so I didn't deny that Insight owners were a "sort of cult", and fortunately, that part of the interview didn't make it into the sound bites.

I don't think of myself as a cult sort of person, but after every meeting with other Insight enthusiasts (who clearly don't fit into any particular stereotype) I can't think of very many "cults" I would rather be associated with. This was reinforced at this year's Tour de Sol event, which took place last week.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
338 Posts
me

i'm part of the black rim/tinted window cult also.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1 Posts
bye bye v6 for ever

:D I just joined the cult last month. I got a used 2001 with 47k on it, and sold my mx6. I average between 3000 and 4000 miles a month between school and work so at 50mpg over 20mpg it was a no brainer. This amazing car pays for itself. I must also say that this forum is great as well. I used it to learn about the car before I bought it and I can't wait to see if I can increase the efficency of my car. Right now it is at 47.2 lifetime mpg. The only bad thing is at work customers are always coming out to look at my car and slowing me down!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
92 Posts
Discussion Starter #6
Well I did own a 1966 Sunbeam Alpine for a while, does that count?

I had to disassemble and clean the dual carbs while on the road a couple times. That was fun.Wire wheels, spin-off hubs.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,211 Posts
Do we know roughly (or precisely) how many Insights have been built worldwide as of now? I couldn't Google an intelligent answer... I was under the impression that Honda begat fewer than 10,000 total worldwide... :cry:

Vipers? As far as I've been able to determine (from nebulous statements like "by 1998, 9500 Vipers had been built..."), over 13,000 Vipers have rolled over our Earth since 1992. Please feel free to give more accurate numbers, I welcome accuracy... :?

There were only 11.703 Plymouth Prowlers built... could it be true that there are more Prowlers than Insights? :oops:

What other "extremely rare" cars have ever been built in greater numbers than our Insights? Now there's a fun trivia category... :lol:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
63 Posts
Honda's own NSX comes to mind. Funny, here in the Bay Area I usually see several a day. Haven't seen one in Nevada yet, but I know there are a few in Reno by this site.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,332 Posts
The DeTomasso Pantera was originally a Ford product. 6,091 cars were sold by Lincoln Mercuryfrom 71-74. Under 10,000 total were sold during it's 20 year production. I don't think I've ever seen one.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
804 Posts
Honda expected to build 5,000 Insights annually.

Does anyone know how many CRX HFs were made from 1984-1992?

I bet they sold more CRX HFs and Honda assumed that was a good guide for the Insight - they are so much alike.

My guess for why the Insight never sold as well as the CRX HF is the price difference - $11,000 vs $20,000 and cutting-edge technology. Small cars were also more popular in the 1980s.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,658 Posts
boogetyboogety said:
Do we know roughly (or precisely) how many Insights have been built worldwide as of now? I couldn't Google an intelligent answer...
I have been able to collate actual & estimated Insight sales from these previous posts:

http://www.insightcentral.net/forum/vie ... php?t=1474

http://www.insightcentral.net/forum/vie ... php?t=4420

Unfortunately Honda deleted the table of sales that they had previously put into the public domain linked to one of my previous posts. However I can say the following sales figures are actual, with only figures followed by '@' as approximate. If anyone can find the actual figures for these, then please post. Sales are shown for all worldwide sales followed by the proportion sold in the USA:

1999 - 252 (mostly Japan)
2000 - 5548 Worldwide, 3788 USA
2001 - [email protected] Worldwide, 4726 USA
2002 - [email protected] Worldwide, 2216 USA
2003 - 1259 Worldwide, 1168 USA
2004 - [email protected] Worldwide, 583 USA
2005 - [email protected] Worldwide, 666 USA
2006 - [email protected] Worldwide (only USA & Japan)

In summary, there are approximately 17,500 Insights worldwide of which about 14,000 are in the USA. Still a pretty rare car.

If anyone can replace the approximate figures with accurate figures then we should post a separate topic about total Insight sales for the record. HTH.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
243 Posts
I think it's interesting that they generally don't call it a "cult" car when it's a sports car. Low production cars that are not sports cars get the label "cult car" implying that they can't understand why any sane person would want to join a cult. I sometimes tell people my Insight is a high-performance car, just on a different axis.

My other car is a 3rd gen RX7 (Often known as a FD). I call it my toy since it's not used for any serious drive chores. (I bike to work and also own a pickup). I bought the FD mostly so I could have a car to work on and will probably go up in value. Someday I might do a web page comparing CYM FDs to CYM Insights.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
89 Posts
Insight sales way below that of the CRX HF

Delta Flyer, Honda sold the CRX HF from '85-'91. In '84 they sold the economy champion CRX 1.3, which had a different engine, and there was no '92 CRX in the U.S.

Honda expected to sell 5,000 Insights annually, and I originally thought that estimate would be too low.

I don't have any statistics showing how many CRX HF models were sold, but Honda did state, according to some car magazines back in the beginning of the '84 model year, that they would allocate 15,000 CRX 1.3 models and 30,000 CRX 1.5 models to the U.S. market. They all sold out, but there were very long waiting lists for the 1.5, which carried over to the '85 model year, whereas the 1.3 models had no waiting list at the dealer I purchased from, but they still sold very quick after arriving at the dealers. From mid-year '85 until '91 they also had the addition of the Si model to the lineup. Honda has never published to the press, as far as I know, how many of each CRX model were sold, but I'd bet it was between 10-15K per year for the HF.

Thus I agree that Honda probably did assume that they'd sell more than they have thus far, with 5,000 as a reasonable target, using the HF sales as a guide, and even adjusting the projected sales estimate downwards by perhaps over 50%, perhaps due to the cost of gasoline declining in real dollars between '91, when the HF last sold, until late '99, when the Insight arrived.

I do believe that the higher price of the Insight over the last '91 CRX HF is somewhat responsible for the much lower sales of the Insight. Even though there was perhaps a $9,000 nominal price difference between the 2, keep in mind that the price difference was perhaps just $4,500 or so in real dollars, adjusting for 9 years of inflation. Even so, the advances made in the Insight, even completely excluding everything that is hybrid related, more than offset the $4,500 difference in real dollars. The CRX HF didn't come standard with: a/c, stereo, speakers, rear window wiper/washer, passenger-side-view mirror, ABS brakes, airbags, aluminum body, aluminum alloy wheels, aluminum brake calipers, fuel economy gauges, electric power steering, and probably some more that I can't recall right now. Moreover, Honda, back in '91 was still only giving a general warranty of just 1 year/12K miles. There's a big value in having the next 2 years/extra miles under full warranty, as I and many other Insight owners have experienced.

On top of all this, the Insight is quicker, much more fuel efficient, offers significantly better crash protection, and a better ride quality, perhaps mostly due to the much more rigid chassis.

However, for some reason, many of the people (likely over 100,000)who purchased a CRX 1.3/HF didn't get interested enough in the Insight to go out and buy one. Perhaps the automotive press played a huge roll in surpressing sales here. During the years the CRX models were sold, the press always gave a big thumbs up to the cars. Most of their reviews were of the CRX 1.5 back in '84, and later on for the Si models. However, as can seemingly happen with any product that's greatly-regarded by the press, sales can carry over to a similar product that they make. And to some extent, I suppose some of the CRX 1.3/HF sales came as a result of the great reviews of the CRX 1.5, and later on the CRX Si. The mainstream automotive press didn't give such great reviews of the Insight. If Honda would have offered from the beginning a sport version of the Insight, along with the version that we ended up getting, then I believe that Honda would've sold more of the version we have, as well as an even larger number of sport versions, assuming that the sport version would've gotten decent reviews by the press.

There are many more reasons we can speculate as to why Insight sales were far short of CRX HF sales, including lack of marketing by Honda. 'Griller', in this discussion thread, referred to the car as "nerdy". Assuming that there's alot of potential buyers who perceive that the Insight would be interpreted as being nerdy, this surely wouldn't entice one to go out and buy the car. On the other hand, CRX owners have never spoken of such an image for the CRX 1.3 and HF models. Again, that's perhaps due to its affiliation with the highly-regarded models that make up the rest of the CRXes out there.


Delta Flyer:
"Honda expected to build 5,000 Insights annually.

Does anyone know how many CRX HFs were made from 1984-1992?

I bet they sold more CRX HFs and Honda assumed that was a good guide for the Insight - they are so much alike.

My guess for why the Insight never sold as well as the CRX HF is the price difference - $11,000 vs $20,000 and cutting-edge technology. Small cars were also more popular in the 1980s."
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,332 Posts
I would suggest that owning an Insight is more like being a member of a clan than a cult, but perhaps a little frugal Scottish heritage is involved. ;)

I'm shocked that people aren't buying the Insight in huge numbers but have concluded that the following factors play a part.

1. When the Insight first appeared Consumer Reports did an inaccurate and damning report on the Insight that was echoed by any magazine either supporting the domestic car industry or promoting gas guzzling sports cars and trucks.

2. Honda never promoted the Insight.

3. Dealers lost money on the Insight and did not want to train their mechanics to work on hybrids, so did not promote or stock it.

4. Buyers were and often still are afraid of new technology.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,332 Posts
I could have added:

5. The Diesel lobby in Europe especially is still trying to discredit hybrids by any means possible, as Diesel engines account for 50 percent of new car sales in Europe, and hybrids are seen as a threat to the total infrastructure.

Fortunately, the Insight "cult" largely based on the Internet and through personal contact saved the Insight from the fate of the Honda EV, which was promoted heavily in California.
 
1 - 16 of 16 Posts
Top