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I have read that filling your tires with Nitrogen instead of air is good for an extra 1 - 2 mpg. Has anyone here tried this? Has also been stated that N gas will not dissipate out of your tires as quickly as air causing you to have to adjust the pressure less often. Has anyone else tried this here?

Right now I have a CRX HF and I can get 52 mpg on teh interstate. I want an insight badly but can't afford a new one. Do teh used ones make good buys in general? Always looking to stretch my mileage some.
 

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Why would it increase fuel mileage?

Normal air from an air compressor is 79% nitrogen, you are only increasing the nitrogen content 21%. If your tires are inflated correctly (wherever you feel safe), mileage should be the same for air or nitrogen.

I don't see where it could be worth the time & trouble.

Regards,
 

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The only advantage to using Nitrogen in tires is, the pressure will not change when the tires heat up during driving. That is one reason why cars that are raced used it. Their pressures are critical at high speeds, so it's important they keep it there during long races.

It has nothing to do with mpg or air escaping from the tires.
 

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According to this article, it does affect mileage 1 - 2 % and N gas doesn't migrate from the tires as fast. Here is a reprint from Environmental Resorce Center's webpage (ercweb.com). Look at the 11th paragraph of the article. You can argue with them if you want.




Resist said:
The only advantage to using Nitrogen in tires is, the pressure will not change when the tires heat up during driving. That is one reason why cars that are raced used it. Their pressures are critical at high speeds, so it's important they keep it there during long races.

It has nothing to do with mpg or air escaping from the tires.




*********************************


Practical Tips to Save on Gas

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With gas prices going up almost daily, everyone is looking for ways to reduce the impact of the increases on their wallet. There are several easy steps you can take today to increase your gas mileage. Take them all and those high prices might not hurt quite as much. If everyone reduces their gasoline consumption, the price might even drop. So, please forward today’s Environmental Resource Center Tip of the Week to anyone that can



Drive with a Light Foot. Aggressive driving (speeding, rapid acceleration and braking) wastes gas. It can lower your gas mileage by 33 percent at highway speeds and by 5 percent around town, which is equivalent to saving $0.11 to $0.73 per gallon. Eliminate jack-rabbit starts. Accelerate slowly when starting from dead stop. Don't push pedal down more than 1/4 of the total foot travel. This allows carburetor to function at peak efficiency. Don’t tailgate and drive at a steady speed. It’s ok to coast down hill.



Observe the Speed Limit. You’ll get the best mileage at about 55 mph. Mileage decreases rapidly at speeds above 60 mph. Each 5 mph over 60 is like paying an additional $0.15 per gallon of gas.



Remove the Junk from Your Car. Empty out your trunk, the back seat, and lighten up as much as possible. An extra 100 lb in your car could reduce your mileage by 2% (or $0.05 a gallon). During cold weather, remove icicles and snow from your car. Up to 100 lb. can be quickly accumulated. Snow and ice can also cause wind resistance that wastes gas.



Avoid Excessive Idling. Turn off the ignition while in the carpool lane or any other time you’ll be stopped for more than one minute.



Use Cruise Control. It will help you maintain a constant speed and can save gas.



Use Overdrive. If your car is equipped with an overdrive gear, it will save gas and reduce engine wear.



Get a Tune-up. As the quality of cars and durability of spark plugs improved, some people stopped getting tune-ups. A poorly tuned car can use up to 25% more gas. Get your car tuned up at least as frequently as recommended by the manufacturer.



Check Your Oxygen Sensor. A faulty oxygen sensor can result in a 40% reduction in mileage.



Replace Your Air Filter. A clogged air filter will reduce air flow and reduce your mileage up to 10%, costing you about $0.25 a gallon.



Keep Your Tires Properly Inflated. Under inflated tires can lower mileage 0.4% for every psi drop. Properly inflated tires are safer and last longer. Fill your tires with nitrogen gas to get even better mileage. Using nitrogen will get you 1 to 2 more miles per gallon and, because nitrogen migrates more slowly from your tires, your tire pressure will remain steady for a longer period of time. Always check the pressure when your tires are cold.



Use the Correct Grade of Motor Oil. If you use 10W-30 oil in a car designed for 5W-30, you’ll waste 1-2% of your gas. Some people swear that using synthetic oil results in better mileage. It’s worth a try.



Drive Less. Here are some ideas: carpool, telecommute, combine trips, eat at home, shop on the internet, take the bus or subway. Get your environmental and safety training without traveling by attending a live webcast.



Consider a Fuel Efficient Car: The next time you are in the market for a car, consider fuel economy as one of the factors in your decision making process. See http://www.fueleconomy.gov/feg/bestworst.shtml for ideas.



Buy Gasoline During the Coolest Time of the Day. Early morning or late evening is best. During these times gasoline is densest. Gas pumps measure volumes of gasoline, not densities of fuel concentration.



Avoid Filling Gas Tank to the Top. Overfilling results in sloshing over and out of tank. Never fill gas tank past the first "click" of fuel nozzle. Close your gas cap tightly.



Close Your Windows. Open car windows cause air drag, reducing your mileage by 10%. Only use the air conditioner when you need it. When the air conditioner is on the engine works harder, increasing gas consumption by about 20%. By keeping the windows closed and turning off the air conditioner, you’ll be able to skip that trip to the sauna.



Vote. Encourage your elected officials to support concepts that save gas, such as improved vehicle efficiency standards, incentives for alternate fuel vehicles, coordinated traffic signals, and road construction designed to unclog traffic bottlenecks. And, if E-85 gasoline is not available in your community, find out why. Many large SUVs, such as some Chevrolet Suburbans can run on both gasoline and E-85 alcohol-gasoline blends, but they can’t find the fuel.



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Belbo said:
According to this article, it does affect mileage 1 - 2 % and N gas doesn't migrate from the tires as fast.

<snip>
Sorry Belbo reRead the article again.

Mileage will only be affected *if* tire pressure is neglected. And you can neglect it longer using nitrogen before the lower pressure MPG loss begins. We Insight hyper-milers already *overinflate* our tires for even better MPG. :D

I think once you investigate the cost of nitrogen you may change your mind. ;)
 

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But as I stated before the real reson to use Nitrogen is that the pressures remain constant as the tire heats up.
 

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Where ya find it?

We have nitrogen bottles (3000 + psi) here at the airline for viarioius stuff, but where would you find it out in the 'real world' ?
For mine, I could sneak my portable air tank to work and sip off 100 psi or so and then pump up with that. If I could find an adapter / filler/ air chuck for the tank from the main bottle.
 

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Interesting points, or maybe misconceptions.

1) Why do you think tire pressures won't change when the nitrogen heats up? Gas laws are gas laws, they don't care which gas you're using. And of course air is about 79% N2 anyway...

(The reason N2 is used for things like filling aircraft landing gear struts is that it's much less reactive than O2, so your strut seals & such don't deteriorate as fast.)

I see they've still got that old error about buying gas at night because it's cooler, therefore denser. Most gas stations have underground tanks, which stay at a pretty constant temperature year-round. And even if the tanks were above ground, 10,000 gallons or more of gas has a lot of thermal inertia :)

And if anyone followed the EPA link, and paged down to the least fuel-efficient cars... since when is a Bentley considered a COMPACT?!?!
 

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james said:
<snip>

Gas laws are gas laws, they don't care which gas you're using. And of course air is about 79% N2 anyway...

<snip>
Yup, but pure N2 dosen't expand as _much_ when heated as the nitrox blend commonly used.

The "gas" laws do take account for the different properties of the gas in question.
 

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cool gas

The temp of the gas underground does stay quite constant but some of the gas is in the pump, fill up after a big suv has sucked 30 gallons and the pump and gas in the pump system will be cooler, you will get a little more. <not much more though!>
 

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Re: Over inflating

SteveChicagoSC said:
Won't over inflating to 40psi cause uneven tire wear?
In a "conventional" tire, yes :!:

However due to some quirk in the OEM LRR's even dangerously overinflating them to 60 psi (xcel has done it for thousands of miles) the "wear" pattern is one of _underinflation_. Edges wear first. :(

Something about the extra stiffness in the cord and how the tread flexes. And I don't think there's even a remotely safe "over inflation" psi that could equalize this pattern.

HTH! :)
 
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