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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I finally got around to buying a tire gauge today so I could check my Insight's tire pressure. I have been averaging about 56 to 58 mpg with the tires at the pressure provided upon delivery from the dealer.
Unfortunately the pressure was - front tires 38 psi, rear tires 32 psi.
I plan to fill up my tank (last gas visit May 17)
:D and pump up my tires to 42psi, front and back.
I will report back on my future gas mileage with pumped up tires.
 

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the tire sidewall rating for the OEM's is 44 psi ;) But expect a harsher ride and a bit easier skidding in emergency conditions. Many hyper milers go to 50 psi.

The difference between your front to back "average" of 36 and increasing to 42 may not be sufficient to definitively see. But it will be there at the pump.

HTH! :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks, John, for the info. Maybe I will just go ahead and inflate to 44 psi. I am a bit reluctant to exceed the tire's rated pressure, although there is probably a corporate policy to rate tires below any actual safety point. I usually pump my bicycle tires above the rating and have never had any problems. Bike tires no doubt encounter much less stress than auto tires, so that may not be a good comparison.
 

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Many of us (including myself), use a tire pressure of 50psi in all tires. From what I understand the tire is actually safety rated higher than that. And no, they didn't stamp that on the tire. I used 50psi when I did a cross country trip in my CVT and averaged 60mpg for 2,000 miles.

I doubt though, should a tire blow out at speed with 50psi will anyone warranty it.
 

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Good points Kevin and Resist. :D

IIRC a tires blowout PSI is 300% of rated sidewall inflation. However, dynamic forces when driving (pot holes etc.) can more easily pop a tire that is over inflated vs. one that's not.

Kevin, thats the key question with the OEM's. There are conflicting credible reports by Insighters that they experience outside edge wear regardless of how much over inflation. And others report "normal" wear with mileages exceeding 80,000 although not all reports state their chosen inflation pressure.

For me I've got slightly over 40K on my second set of OEM's and both outside edges are worn to the tread wear indicators. :( I inflate to 50 psi and the wheel alignment is _perfect_. So maybe its my driving style, but I know how to get ultra miles out of a set of tires :!: I managed 180,000 on a set of Michelin LX1's on a CRX HF. Or its the _over inflation_ and something in these LRR tires design that causes wear _opposite_ of what is _normal_ for such pressures :?:

Is there any member in here that already _knows_ how to correctly read tire wear from experience (you know who you are) and seen anything to explain the differences :?:

My only conclusion is that the reports of wear being "normal" are from those inexperienced in judging tires or its the over inflation _causing_ wear opposite of what should be expected (my case).
 

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If a tire were to blowout at speed while inflated to 50 psi, how would anyone warrantying the tire know what it was inflated to prior to blowing? I personally wouldn't offer that info if it were me. I would simply tell them the tire was inflated to manufacturer's specifications.
 

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LED pressure indicators

Has anyone tried the LED indicator caps that flash when the pressure drops 4 psi from where it started? They look like a good option for those running at higher psi than the 40 psi tire minders max out at.

If no one else has experience with them, maybe I'll get a set and be the test case! :)
 

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Scott said:
If a tire were to blowout at speed while inflated to 50 psi, how would anyone warrantying the tire know what it was inflated to prior to blowing?
They would be able to tell if they examined the tire and rim. So the evidence would be there and lying about it probably wouldn't be wise.
 

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Well Resist,

I'm having a difficult time understanding how they could too. And I think that takes much more than 50 psi.

To all,

I think its more approprate to not "discuss" ways of dodging personal responsibility. If you overinflate and there's a blow out then buy another tire. So please let this sub topic drop.

Sincerely,
 

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Insightful Trekker said:
I'm having a difficult time understanding how they could too.
I agree we should never tell a lie about this. They probably wouldn't be able to tell is the tire was over pressured initially but if they took it to their labs for further examination they could tell. They know what types of materials shear at certain pressures.
 

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I am not curious as far as lying about it, but just how could they really tell? I could understand if you went extremely over such as doubling the pressure, but 6 lbs over thier safety rating ... well, wouldn't a few mph difference in speed/angle/shape of the obstacle create a bigger difference? I would have no problem telling them that I used their max pressure as opposed to the cars recommended, since it is just that, a compromise between comfort, noise, and efficiency, but I would eat the cost of the tire when I am above that point. I personally run 60 psi in my HCH I, I don't notice any difference in ride or noise. I am not reccommending such a high pressure to anyone though, and my tires are rated a little higher as well. I do notice a better rolling resistance, better take off, better traction, easier to turn the wheel, but I honestly don't notice too great of an improvement in MPG (1-2), too many other factors right now are having a much greater effect (90+ temps, hilly stop and go traffic). I would let it back down but I really see no point either way. I more than likely won't pump it back up so high again though. Doesn't matter anyway, I am looking to get rid of the HCH for an Insight soon :D
 

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bluesesshomaru17 said:
I would have no problem telling them that I used their max pressure
And there in is the tricky part. They would state the max pressure is listed on the side wall of the tire (and it's not 50psi). The safety rating is not put on the tire, only the max pressure rating. They do this for liability reasons.
 
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Hi Resist:

___It is actually much higher for a particular brand you and I are intimately familiar with although you may never find the actual “Burst Safety Factor” for a given brand or tire online. I would highly suggest that you seek out and speak openly with an inside source who is directly involved in the manufacture and safety testing of a particular brand or make of tire you may be interested in while in a non-hostile environment. At that point, you will find yourself questioning your own discussion in this particular thread about safe pressure limits for relatively new and well cared for tire(s). At 100K + w/ the belts showing, that is an entirely different situation altogether.

___Good Luck

___Wayne R. Gerdes
 

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Leave out one simple word and the "debate" continues. ;)

I should have more completely qualified my remark.

AFAIK for most tires burst pressure is in excess of 300% of the rated pressure. Probably all automobile tires, but then you'd have to qualify load range and all the other details too. Are you talking about the pressure that will de-bead the tire, or one that will rupture the side wall. And "causing" a rupture through the belt area would require much more pressure.

My point was that given the overload factor, the over inflation we're practicing in here is _almost_ a non issue. But if your in the wrong place at the wrong time...

HTH! :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
I pumped up my tires to 50 psi today. The ride is slightly stiffer but not rough. Now to see what effect there is on my mileage.
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
With tires pumped up to 50 psi, my initial assessment is an increase of about 3 mpg. Since there could be other factors affecting the mileage, I will report again when I have average tankful mpg information.
I am hoping for an overall increase in my average but time will tell.
The ride is just a bit rougher, maybe not exactly rough, but I can definitley feel the road surface with pumped up tires.
 
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