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my 2012 insight lx tire pressure is recommed at 33psi. i notice some members put more air in the tires,does this increase in air pressure improve mpg. is putting more air in the tires safe?
 

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More air pressure will increase your mileage. There are a lot of us using higher than sidewall max pressure and I have not heard of anyone having problems. At least one member is running 80psi on the first gen Insight RE 92 tires and has been for years.

The only blowout that I read about was caused by running near flat, I'm pretty sure.

If you are worried only inflate to the sidewall max pressure listed on the tire, but it does make a differance.
 

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Running higher tire pressure(36 PSI or higher) is only going to minimally increase MPG;while making for a louder, harsher ride and decreasing traction.

I not only run around 35 PSI but have a touring tire in 195 60 15 and get anywhere between 44-49 MPG(actual) per tank. (depending on the ratio of city to highway driving)
 

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Running higher tire pressure(36 PSI or higher) is only going to minimally increase MPG;while making for a louder, harsher ride and decreasing traction.

I not only run around 35 PSI but have a touring tire in 195 60 15 and get anywhere between 44-49 MPG(actual) per tank. (depending on the ratio of city to highway driving)
atleast with the insight the ride "harshness" by upping your pressur to the sidewall specs is minimal if at all noticable.

You forget one large aspect. The tires will last MUCH LONGER!

lower pressure you will starting going bald on the edges much earlier causing you to have a shorter life span on the tires. This is esspecially evident if you ever had a very heavy car.
 

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I have a 2010 and right now I have mine set at 45 per tire with the rating at 44. The ride can be a little rough on some roads but I haven't had any trouble. I tried lowering them to 35 and it really does make a huge difference in how far I can coast when I'm rolling up to a light or a stop sign. I personally like having them higher with the ride and rolling resistance. Right now I'm showing 64 mpg with mixed driving over about 185 miles on this tank. So its a small portion of getting better mileage but it can help.
 

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jtshuey:
Please post your location in your UserCP/Details/Location.

Willie
 

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I have a 2010 and right now I have mine set at 45 per tire with the rating at 44. The ride can be a little rough on some roads but I haven't had any trouble. I tried lowering them to 35 and it really does make a huge difference in how far I can coast when I'm rolling up to a light or a stop sign. I personally like having them higher with the ride and rolling resistance. Right now I'm showing 64 mpg with mixed driving over about 185 miles on this tank. So its a small portion of getting better mileage but it can help.
64 MPG is fantastic!
 

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I have Conti Pro Contact Eco Plus for about 7k miles. Run at 40psi, sidewall rating 44psi. Ride is a bit firm. Commute about 150mi a day. Highway. Average 48-49 at 70-71mph.
Tire pressure will effect MPG 1-2 for every 2-4 psi increase.
All depends on the ride you like.
Driving habits make for better MPG.;)
 

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Tire pressure will effect MPG 1-2 for every 2-4 psi increase.
All depends on the ride you like.
Driving habits make for better MPG.;)
That's been pretty much my experience as well. I've done allot of experimenting with different tire pressures, and have settled on 39/39 psi, set first thing in the morning before moving the car (pressures are sensitive to temperature). I check'um roughly once a month.

The terrain here is both hilly and often windy. For me a softer ride is nice, but I like firm precise responsive handling and so some extra air above the recommended psi is preferable. I've found though, that too much air makes the car sensitive to cross winds, beginning at around 60 mph; and sometims a bit of an effort to drive straight in the 70 - 75 mph range. Also when hard cornering in the 35 - 50 mph range, I scare myself that any slight error on my part will cause a rollover (due to the super sensitive steering). So coming down to a cold 39/39 psi, decreases psychological pressure while increasing driving pleasure.

I've also found that increasing tire pressure is the SINGLE BIGGEST THING one can do to increase their mpg (outside of mechanical changes like more battery radiator blocks and etc.). The bigger the increase, the larger the mpg increase. I've found that the amount of mpg increase roughly equal to the amount of mpg increase I obtained from a large number, of sometimes subtle, changes in driving style.
 

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That's been pretty much my experience as well. I've done allot of experimenting with different tire pressures, and have settled on 39/39 psi, set first thing in the morning before moving the car (pressures are sensitive to temperature). I check'um roughly once a month.

The terrain here is both hilly and often windy. For me a softer ride is nice, but I like firm precise responsive handling and so some extra air above the recommended psi is preferable. I've found though, that too much air makes the car sensitive to cross winds, beginning at around 60 mph; and sometims a bit of an effort to drive straight in the 70 - 75 mph range. Also when hard cornering in the 35 - 50 mph range, I scare myself that any slight error on my part will cause a rollover (due to the super sensitive steering). So coming down to a cold 39/39 psi, decreases psychological pressure while increasing driving pleasure.

I've also found that increasing tire pressure is the SINGLE BIGGEST THING one can do to increase their mpg (outside of mechanical changes like more battery radiator blocks and etc.). The bigger the increase, the larger the mpg increase. I've found that the amount of mpg increase roughly equal to the amount of mpg increase I obtained from a large number, of sometimes subtle, changes in driving style.
We have used 37/37 psi with the Nokian tires. By the way Moviemike where do you live on the Southern Oregon coast. We have a house in Southern Oregon in a town called Talent, which is between Ashland and Medford. My wife drives between our apartment in Southern Cal to our house in Oregon with the I2 quite often. It is very difficult to get over 50mpg average on that route (Interstate 5), and typically she gets around 45-47mpg averaging 75mph. Has anyone else drive the I5 from California to Oregon. I notice the car get much better mpg on highway 101 than 5 but don't see any reason this should be the case.
 

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We have used 37/37 psi with the Nokian tires. By the way Moviemike where do you live on the Southern Oregon coast. We have a house in Southern Oregon in a town called Talent, which is between Ashland and Medford. My wife drives between our apartment in Southern Cal to our house in Oregon with the I2 quite often. It is very difficult to get over 50mpg average on that route (Interstate 5), and typically she gets around 45-47mpg averaging 75mph. Has anyone else drive the I5 from California to Oregon. I notice the car get much better mpg on highway 101 than 5 but don't see any reason this should be the case.
I live in North Bend.

I've passed the exit from i5 to Talent many times. I've often imagined that that is where the actors in the Ashland Shakespearian Festival live. :)

I'd think 47 - 49 at 75 mph on flat terrain would be pretty good, but there are some special factors which I think may impact her trip up from Calif. Specifically the very long and slow change in altitude from just North of the turn off from S.F. (on to I5) about 30 miles N of Sacramento all the way to Red Bluff, Ca. Driving Southbound she should get great mpg at 75, Northbound the reverse. Lowering her speed on the Northbound trip ( to say 65 mph) might make a substantial difference.

Another factor ( which I've recently come to realize as significant) is the amount of TIME spent running at very low mpg vs amount of time spent at a high mpg. A dramatic illustration of this factor could be a round trip from Talent to Yreka through the Siskiyou Pass. Southbound from Talent the climb is short and steep - smaller amount of time at low mpg. Northbound from Yreka, the climb is long and ( relatively ) gradual - longer amount of time at low mpg!

I've taken many trips NB - SF in another car. Some down 101 some I5, and got better mpg via 101. Counting the long climbs from Roseburg to Grants Pass, there is one less long climb on the 101 route. I used to think that was the explanation. But my experience with the I2 has me thinking that perhaps the lower speeds (60 vs 70-75 avg) and warmer temperatures along the coast are also important factors..
 

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I live in North Bend.

I've passed the exit from i5 to Talent many times. I've often imagined that that is where the actors in the Ashland Shakespearian Festival live. :)

I'd think 47 - 49 at 75 mph on flat terrain would be pretty good, but there are some special factors which I think may impact her trip up from Calif. Specifically the very long and slow change in altitude from just North of the turn off from S.F. (on to I5) about 30 miles N of Sacramento all the way to Red Bluff, Ca. Driving Southbound she should get great mpg at 75, Northbound the reverse. Lowering her speed on the Northbound trip ( to say 65 mph) might make a substantial difference.

Another factor ( which I've recently come to realize as significant) is the amount of TIME spent running at very low mpg vs amount of time spent at a high mpg. A dramatic illustration of this factor could be a round trip from Talent to Yreka through the Siskiyou Pass. Southbound from Talent the climb is short and steep - smaller amount of time at low mpg. Northbound from Yreka, the climb is long and ( relatively ) gradual - longer amount of time at low mpg!

I've taken many trips NB - SF in another car. Some down 101 some I5, and got better mpg via 101. Counting the long climbs from Roseburg to Grants Pass, there is one less long climb on the 101 route. I used to think that was the explanation. But my experience with the I2 has me thinking that perhaps the lower speeds (60 vs 70-75 avg) and warmer temperatures along the coast are also important factors..
Talent is a bedroom community for Ashland, and fortunately it is a lot less expensive. We could not afford now to buy back the house we sold in Ashland many years ago.

I have driven 101 route all the way from Southern Oregon to Southern California in the I2 several times, as well the I5 route. I have averaged just over 50mpg on the 101 several times and 49mpg at the low end. I have been able to get 50mpg once going North (the less efficient direction) on I5 but typically I get around 46mpg. I think it is not only the changes in elevation and speeds, but some other factors, such as the road surface. We are talking about a trip on I5 of over 600miles, and on the 101 even longer. So there are many elevation changes over such a long distance. One of the main contributors to mpg on these long trips is the direction and speed of the wind. I have a 35 mile course in Southern Cal that I have used for several years now where I try to get my best mileage. My record to date is 72mpg at an average speed of 60-65mph. But my best mpg efforts varying by 10mpg (62mpg to 72mpg) depending on temperature, traffic (it is LA) and the wind. The wind direction and speed is the only parameter I can see really has a big effect on mpg when all other conditions are optimal.

By the way I really have enjoyed my visits to Bend. Perhaps one of these days we will be up in your area and can say hello.
 

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I agree that wind and road surface have a really big effect on mpg.

I first noticed the effect of road surface in my old car when I drove it cross country to Brunswick Maine. It became really clear when a local road I use a lot was repaved. Wow what a big, and totally unexpected increase.

Wind blows here most of the time. I drive N - S and S - N a lot, so things tend to cancel out, with super mpg one direction and poor in the other.

Be happy to meet with you.

BTW.. Bend is Norh of you near Three Sisters. I'm in NORTH Bend which is near Coos Bay.
 

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Tire Blowout

More air pressure will increase your mileage. There are a lot of us using higher than sidewall max pressure and I have not heard of anyone having problems. At least one member is running 80psi on the first gen Insight RE 92 tires and has been for years.

The only blowout that I read about was caused by running near flat, I'm pretty sure.

If you are worried only inflate to the sidewall max pressure listed on the tire, but it does make a differance.
I recently had a rear tire blowout while driving my new Insight at 120 kph. The new Bridgestone Turanza tires were set on 40psi and clocked less than 3000km. There was no sign of puncture on the tire except for damage on the sidewall (probably due to the speed and time to stop). The valve seems to be intact. Could it be possible that the tire failed due to the over-pressure at high speed and road temperature (tropical weather)?
 

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I recently had a rear tire blowout while driving my new Insight at 120 kph. The new Bridgestone Turanza tires were set on 40psi and clocked less than 3000km. There was no sign of puncture on the tire except for damage on the sidewall (probably due to the speed and time to stop). The valve seems to be intact. Could it be possible that the tire failed due to the over-pressure at high speed and road temperature (tropical weather)?
Since its a new tire, a defect in workmanship - tire manufacture could be explored as well, with a possible free replacement tire in the offing.

Unless your cold temperature tire pressure was above the sidewall max. you shouldn't have had any problems unless you were driving in extreme conditions (i.e. How many hours at 120 kph, with how much weight, in how hot is "tropical"?).
 

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Sorry to hear of the blow out. At least you werent injuired. Ive always used the sidewall psi and in many cases as Ive driven a few rental vehicles Ive found at least one tire to have close to 100 psi and another 20. My first stop is to find an air machine and make them all equal.

Hell, many of the gen1 guys push 80-120 psi. :D
 

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The max pressure indicated on outside wall was 44psi while the tires were set to 40. I was driving on the toll highway (with average speed of 110kph) for only slightly more than 1 hour. The outside temperature was around 35 celcius (95F) and the car was not fully loaded to be considered as extreme conditions.

It may have been some form of manufacturing defect of other undetected conditions. Unfortunately, I left the damaged tire in a tire shop making it difficult to claim from the Honda dealer or to really find out what happen. I have replaced both the rear tires with Continental with max rated pressure of 51 psi. I plan to rotate the tires (with the Conti in front and bridgestone to the rear) and will try again. Hopefully, if it happens again, it will be on the rear..
 

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...Unfortunately, I left the damaged tire in a tire shop making it difficult to claim from the Honda dealer or to really find out what happen.
....I have replaced both the rear tires with Continental with max rated pressure of 51 psi. I plan to rotate the tires (with the Conti in front and bridgestone to the rear) and will try again. Hopefully, if it happens again, it will be on the rear..
Too bad about leaving the tire behind. Looks like manufactoring defect to me.

I've had an analogous experience in that I picked-up a very large nail in a rear tire that pierced the sidewall. Both rear tires had to be replaced. The regional chain tire store had a new policy of recommending alignment check with purchase. Had that done (at 10k on the odometer), and found that the front end was massively out of alignment, causeing excessive wear on the front tires. I replaced the fronts at 15k, due to heavy and uneven wear. Am up to 37k currently. Have recently rechecked alignment, it was slightly off, but tire wear on all four "new" tires is even with "normal" reduction in tread depth....using the forefinger in the grove measuring method. ...:)
 
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