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Discussion Starter #1
Something very strange occured the last time I checked the pressure of my Insight's rear tires. It was a cold morning, and the car had been sitting for a while, so I thought it would be a perfect time for an accurate reading. I was totally unsuspecting of the perplexing trick my car was about to play on me.

I usually keep the rear tires at a pressure of around 38psi. First, I checked the left tire, for that tire tends to lose air faster than the others. This time it was unusually low, at around 30psi. Then, I moved around to the right tire, which normally remains at a constant pressure. However, when I looked at the gauge, it read 42psi.

I have no idea how or why this tire had a greater psi than what I inflated it to, especially after driving the car so long without filling the tires. It was also very cold that morning, and I had not driven it for a few days, so I can't see how heat might have caused the air to expand. All the other tires were almost as low as the first one I checked.

Unless someone is playing a joke on me and adding air to that tire behind my back, I am mystified. Or do tires sometimes do this spontaneously?

Luna
 

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Weren't you having a mouse problem recently?

Those things are well-known practical jokers.
 

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Hmmmmm, Spontaneaous creation of correct tire pressure. "Verrrry intesesting, but styoopid".

Possibly a misread air guage? 48 instead of 38? :wink:
 

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Discussion Starter #4
I am familair with the scientific method and checked the air gauge three times to make sure it was correct. After letting some air out to bring the pressure back down, I checked the tire again, and it correctly read 38psi. No need to be fresh. I was just wondering if someone had a similar experience.

Luna
 

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Luna, Misreading a tire guage is the sort of thing I would do. (I'm assuming that someone isn't actually trying to play a prank.) If the tire was reading 42 PSI in cold weather then it would probably read about 46 PSI in warm weather. Many Insighters have inflated their tires to the 45 to 50 PSI range and have noticed improved tread wear characteristics and better mileage. I use 46 myself.

I was laughing to myself trying to visualize a mouse blowing on the air valve. The quote "verrrry interesting............." refers to a program called Laugh In that used to air on TV. In between skits a little German guy would pop on the screen wearing a helmet and after taking a drag on a cigarette would pronounce his critique in an affected German accent. I'm probably just dating myself as an old fart. :D

Kip
 

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Luna,

What type of air guage are you using? Is it one of those stick pen type or a dial guage? Upgrade to a good dial pressure indicator if you don't have one yet, they are very accurate.

Different tire pressures on different sides of the car can be created by the sun. It may be cold out side but if the sun is shining on that side of the car then the pressure of the tire can easily increase five or so pounds. I've seen this happen at the track on a sunny day.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
I use a digital gauge to check tire pressure. The car was in the garage when I checked the tires, so I didn't even think about the sun. But, you know, there just happens to be a window situated above that particular tire. Sparky5501 has solved yet another mystery!

Luna
 

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Discussion Starter #10
It's the sun. I checked the tire both when the sun was and was not shining through the window. The result was a few extra psi in the tire when under direct sunlight. I guess black tires are very heat absorbent.

Luna
 

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Cool...

or warm, which ever.

Now you need to replicate it with all 3 other tires before I am satisfied :wink:
 

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Tricksy tires

Black Tires absorb heat,
I guess everyone knows black is not rubbers natural color but is added to create black tires.Makes one wonder why we don't have different colored tires available.White walls once the very" in thing" in the US ran cooler than the black versions but that was before the radial invasion which reduced running temperatures over cross-plys.
I suppose one practical reason for black is anything else would mark easily and look scruffy quickly.

Dgate
 
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