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Discussion Starter #1
The main problem with the Bridgestones that come on the Insight seems to be uneven wear (even if you keep them rotated). Two of the original tires on my 02 CVT have worn bald on the sides (though tread in the middle is pretty good). But the tires on the front are in really decent shape, so I'm considering a purchase of just two tires. I've always been told that's a mistake, but the light weight of the Insight makes me wonder if I might be able to stretch some more miles out of the two that are still okay. (I'm at 56,000 miles right now). Anybody have experience with this?
 

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As long as your replacing the two with the same OEM Bridgestones then you should be OK.However, if your looking for a change then given the very different characteristics of the OEM's this much of a mismatch will likely be more significant. Particularly in emergency handling conditions. :oops: (crunch)

And trying to eek out the last few cents of value for any tire is risky. Tires are cheaper than bumpers or fenders. ;)

For one tire brand MPG difference see:

Tire Comparison Test
http://www.insightcentral.net/forum/vie ... 38&start=0

HTH! :)
 

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i kust picked up 4 185/60r14's from discount for 42 each.
50,000 mile waranty
low rolling resistance barum bravarious.
they are marketed by continental.
the ride is way better than the over sized 175/65r14's and the gas milaged picked up also.
they're 22.8 dia so they're only .3 taller than the stock 165/65r14's
 

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If you want to stick with the OEM tires, the Firestone dealer on Broadway in Fountain City (N. Knoxville) has always had them in stock. See Tim or Vance.
 

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MrCoffee said:
low rolling resistance barum bravarious.
<snip>
the ride is way better than the over sized 175/65r14's and the gas milaged picked up also.
they're 22.8 dia so they're only .3 taller than the stock 165/65r14's
You'd need to know the rev's per mile for an accurate MPG compairson. Diameter won't work sufficiently for an accurate compairson. Any deviation from OEM spec will skew the Odometer and therefore the MPG meter. And from your description of a better ride I'd tend to believe a higher rolling resistance than OEM's.

More accurate data would be appreciated. So far the other tire options have proven to be lower MPG at a benefit of smoother / softer ride and better handling.
 

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well the one's that came on my used insight were 175/65r14's
pirelli's on the front and michelins on the back.
my usable torque was down because of the increased dia of those tires
and the mpg was running below average.
now with these it has better ride and also better mpg than before.
rpm 165/65r14 926.92 mph 65
rpm 185/60r14 914.69 mph 65.87
rpm 175/65r14 905.92 mph 66.51
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Thanks very much for the helpful input. Though I haven't posted much, I really enjoy this site. I think I'll stay on the safe side and go with four new Potenzas.
 

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Just so you know about my experiences, since my 1966 MG1100 (think Morris Minor/Austin America), I have NEVER rotated tires on a front-driver. EVER. Which results in rear tires that last the lifetime of the car, plus (my personal best, I ran the original tires on the rear of a first-year Toyota Tercel for 190,000 miles, no kidding) and only the front tires needing replacement at normal wear replacements (since I don't drive like a madman, usually 50-65,000 miles). I've "overinflated" my Insight tires to 50 pounds at all four corners, and with 37,000 miles, the edges of the front tires are wearing somewhat (and I'll probably replace them by year's end), but I could probably pass inspection with them for another 20,000 miles (my estimate). All rear tires do on a front drive car is hold up the rear end, and they just don't seem to suffer the wear and tear of the fronts. As always, YMMV, but the above has worked for me for forty years... ;)
 

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There is one caveat to this practice, the tires tread design.

Tires with block segmented tread when left too long on the rear of a
front wheel drive (FWD) car will begin a wear pattern called heel-toe. The more "aggressive" the design the easier this wear will develop. Tread with bigger blocks and or wider gaps are worse, but its not all bad. In general these type tread designs grip the road better in slippery conditions without sacrificing other desirable qualities. Tires whose predominant tread pattern is a "ring" around the tire (in the tires rolling direction) are more resistant to this wear. But most modern patterns use the block segment pattern to some mixed degree. The worst of the worst for heel-toe wear are uni-directional tires (tires that have a direction of rotation requirement, a "rotation" direction arrow is molded in the sidewall).

Just like your foot these individual segments _tend_ to push with their "toe" on acceleration and dig with their "heel" on braking. Since the rear wheels of a FWD vehicle don't push power to the pavement the rear tires _will_ begin to wear unevenly in this "saw toothed" pattern (more wear occurs on the heel of each segment).

As the wear progresses because of the additional forces this pattern causes when rolling on the road it will begin to cause what is called diagonal wear. A diagonal band across the tread that wears faster (thinner). In addition slight to moderate heel toe wear is noisy, like snow tires.

Slight to moderate heel-toe wear can usually be eliminated by cross rotation of the two tires in question. Advanced heel-toe or diagonal wear is unrecoverable by rotation. :( Depending on the severity I sometimes prefer to leave them on the rear (swapping R :arrow: L) to try and more effectively "smooth" the tread back out. But rotation to the front is usually the best course of action. Shaving a tire usually consumes soo much tread life that only auto crossers do it for cornering performance. So once such wear progress too far the tire is going to be a goner sooner rather than later. Plus _increasingly_ obnoxiously noisy too :!:

Typically (YMMV) 20+% of a tires tread life is lost due to lack of rotation when this wear is allowed to fully progress.

The Insight's OEM Bridgestones tread design is heel-toe wear resistant.

HTH! :)
 

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Amazing, Insightful Trekker, the things I learn in this forum. Indeed, now that you mention it, that's exactly the kind of wear that has led me to replace the rear tires in front drivers on the few instances I've kept a car long enough to do so. I imagine I'll see something similar in my Insight when I replace the tires in, oh, ten or twelve years of my average driving... :lol: thanks, John, apreciate the "Insight..."
 

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If you'd rotate'em you might make 15 years. :p

But then I'd have to write a tire "dry-rot" post too.

Seriously, thanks for the feedback. And glad to be of service. :)

Such kind feedback further motivated me to polish my post above.

Sincerely,
 
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