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Discussion Starter #1
Has anyone finally come up with a good IMA fan solution to keep the packs cooler? There are a several old threads with different types of setup (single fan with higher CFM, two fans, shroud, no shroud), but no final report on how well it works.

I finally gave in and bought a new set of IMA packs from Hybrid Revolt and want to see if I can have these last longer than my OEM packs. Anyone have any good solutions to report??
 

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Premium Member
2001 5S "Turbo"
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I've had a higher CFM fan installed for a very very long time. And it does work as designed.
I also have a switch to control the fan, it does it's job. During the HOT season I just leave it on all the time. No it doesn't kill the battery, it only works when the ignition is ON.

BOTTOM LINE:
The air cooling the battery will never be lower than the air inside the vehicle.

HTH
Willie
 

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BOTTOM LINE:
The air cooling the battery will never be lower than the air inside the vehicle.

HTH
Willie
Perfectly said

I use a high cfm mechatronics fan with the factory shroud. It does require you to remove four little corner tabs on the fan to fit.

The "ultimate" setup would be Mike D's setup that ties into the A/C ductwork to bring cooler Air through, a higher cfm fan, along with a revolt battery fan control module And the absolute darkest window tinting possible to limit the greenhouse effect. Always park in the shade and use sun shades on every window.

Also there might be some benefit to directing the outgoing battery pack air outside the body of the car somehow to help minimize heat gain in the cabin as much as possible.

None of this stuff sounds like a cake walk, but did ask for a cake walk! You asked for "ULTIMATE"
 

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One of the issues is the IMA system let's the battery get too hot before it starts working.
It's then playing catch up, so using an OBDIIC&C to turn it on earlier/automatically is useful.
The stock fan is quite good but needs to run a lot more at high speed in hotter climates.

Seal up the fan/cowling edge with duct tape to increase efficiency.
Don't block the air intake behind the seat.

I also use a higher CFM fan it works fine.

Be aware that the stock low speed fan setting passes through a resistor on the switch board matched to the oem fan draw current, so a higher cfm fan may need a different resistor to get a realistic two speed configuration.

Most higher cfm fans will need a lower value resistor to pass enough current at the low speed setting or they might not start/run properly.

I suggest try for 1/3rd speed in low setting and full speed at high setting.
That way noise will not be intrusive as some high cfm fans sound like a hoover/leaf blower.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Thanks guys, sounds like sticking with the single high cfm fan is the way to go.

@stueveo, what are the tabs you are talking about that need to be removed?

I would be perfectly happy if the battery can stay at the same temp as the air inside the vehicle. :) I was hoping someone had come up with a better way of venting all the hot air being blown into the IPU compartment. The heat soak damage caused by not being able to remove all the warm exhaust is well covered in many of the threads.

Has anyone thought of punching maybe a 3-4 inch hole just to the right of the battery fan and ducting it out to the rear passenger trunk vent? At least that way the warm air can be cooled back down by running the a/c or having the window down if it's cool enough outside. You can probably tuck low profile fans on both ends of the duct to help move the air along. How risky would this be since it would break the containment of the IPU compartment??
 

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Discussion Starter #6
... Be aware that the stock low speed fan setting passes through a resistor on the switch board matched to the oem fan draw current, so a higher cfm fan may need a different resistor to get a realistic two speed configuration.
Peter good point about the resistor. Is it easy to remove the old resistor or bypass it and replacing it with a different value? I'm not sure where it is on the switch board so not sure how it is done.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Thanks Stueveo. The youtube videos don't seem to work anymore. But I assume the pictures you're referring to are pascal28's pictures where the extra mounting flanges that are filed off?

So I tried to remove the old fan, but the nuts and bolts seem to be permantly fused?? Do I have to just saw them off and get new bolts?
 

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It is a simple, "unbolt" operation.
Got a picture of your Problem bolts?

Willie
 

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Discussion Starter #10
It is a simple, "unbolt" operation.
Got a picture of your Problem bolts?

Willie
Unfortunately no. I'll take some next time I remove the IPU cover. I had a combination wrench on one end and a vice wrench on the other and I couldn't get any of the 4 to budge. Good to know it's a simple "unbolt" operation. Didn't think it should be that hard.
 

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Be careful how many amps the fan needs to run when you charge the battery. I have a bigger fan in one and the charger won't work unless I tap into another power source. Pay attention to that when you buy a charger.
 

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Thanks Stueveo. The youtube videos don't seem to work anymore. But I assume the pictures you're referring to are pascal28's pictures where the extra mounting flanges that are filed off?

So I tried to remove the old fan, but the nuts and bolts seem to be permantly fused?? Do I have to just saw them off and get new bolts?
I fixed the Youtube videos. They should all be working now.

I have pictures in that thread where I used a soldering iron to melt the tabs off. The plastic is brittle so either a file like you mentioned or melting them off works best.

Also the four mounting holes need to be enlarged for the existing fan mounting bolts and rubber isolator collars to fit.

You need a set of vise grips or channel locks to get the bolts out. Use one hand to hold the nut/clip retainers and keep them from spinning while you use the other hand to loosen the bolts.
 

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I know that this is a really old discussion, but I was just looking over it as I replaced my IMA fan for the 3rd time (after the original lasting for 18 yrs). Anyway, the fastest and easiest way that I found to trim the replacement fan housing down so it is like the OEM is by using a bench grinder. It melts and microchips it away pretty quickly. I just did one in about 10 minutes today (way too much experience doing this recently).😄
 

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Linsight Designer
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The solution I use is to always run the PDU fan on low speed (by replacing the PDU fan relay with a shunt). The PDU fan is the only way to cycle cooler exterior air through the greenhouse-like passenger compartment. As the PDU fan cools the DCDC converter and IGBT module, this in turn cools the IMA bay ambient air, which in turn cools the IMA pack.
 

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Right, ignition in the running position.
 

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@davismltc
The PDU fan airflow path is OEM.

@Natalya
In a car with the stock battery, the PDU fan runs only when the ignition is 'ON'. Since the PDU fan positive is powered at all times, you need to get "hot in on or start" from somewhere else... I do this by shorting PNK/BLU on the low speed relay to BLK/YEL on the low speed battery fan relay.

With a large enough lithium pack - and an always-on DCDC converter - I would always keep the PDU fan on (i.e. even when the key is 'OFF', as long as the pack is above 23 degC). Linsight will do this by default (user configurable if not desired).
 
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