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Discussion Starter #1
I was wondering about the max weight that I can put back in the Insight's cargo area? I ask because I'm supposed to pick up a transmission for my Civic, and it will be a 6 hour drive. I'll have a passenger, otherwise I'd just take out the passenger seat. Am I ok to have the transmission in the cargo area? I'll have it a large Walmart plastic container so I don't get oil in the back.

If I had to guess, I'd say the transmission weighs somewhere from 100-120 pounds. Thanks for the advice!
 

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Yo may want to check Mike's thread about a possibly warped rear trailing arms.

But just for the rear deck, you should consider that the "floor" in the cargo area is basically a thin aluminum lid that is supported on top of the battery and the power converters underneath. It's styrofoam blocks and thin aluminum supports that carry the weight.

At the very least, I'd suggest using a strong sheet of plywood or some such to spread the weight. 100 pounds on a small point could easily dent the aluminum panel. But even then... It's a lot of weight you want to put on there!
 

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Like Armin said, a piece of plywood on the floor of the cargo area is a good idea.
Make sure the plastic container fits because of the slope of the rear hatch many don't fit.
The weight of a civic transmission is not a problem.
But to prevent it from going through your head and killing you during a mild fender bender, you should secure it with strong straps to the child seat anchor in the rear and the cargo net anchors and maybe the seat base.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Guillermo said:
Like Armin said, a piece of plywood on the floor of the cargo area is a good idea.
Thanks. But doesn't it seem like a stury enough piece of plywood is just going to add weight too, perhaps counteracting any good it might have been doing?

Very good thought on tying it down though; that had slipped my mind.
 

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Strap it down, make sure that it is sitting flat, possibily on the bell housing, and as Armin said, a piece of plywood to prevent damage to the very thin aluminum cover of the electronics box, and you should be ok.
getting the weight towards the front just behind the seats, will help distribute it, and hopefully you would still have a bit of suspension travel left.
Good luck.
;)
 

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I know that when I load my cargo area with groceries and have a passenger, I tend to bottom out the rear suspension quite easily. I tend to think that a civic transmission would weigh more than a load of groceries. 6 hours is a long ride with alot of weight. You might be ok, maybe not. The Insight wasn't designed to haul much more than 2 passengers and a few odds and ends.
 

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How about using a sheet of plywood paneling or a piece of one or two inch thick styrofoam insulation to distribute the weight?
 

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Scott said:
I know that when I load my cargo area with groceries and have a passenger, I tend to bottom out the rear suspension quite easily.
When my wife and I(combined weight about 340lbs) load up with groceries, we don't seem to have a problem. We drove cross country with the back loaded with well over 120lbs and had no problem either, perhaps because the weight was distributed evenly over the back.
 

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OK, one more tip. Don't fill the gas tank full. If you drive with the tank at 30 percent you will remove about 40 pounds of gasoline from the rear of the car. You will still have a range of over 200 miles easily! :D
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Thanks for all the tips. I plan on making the trip tonight, and already have some plywood, bungee cords, and a short plastic container in the back.
 

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mrredrocker said:
plywood, bungee cords, and a short plastic container in the back.
Not bungee cords!
They are only adequate to keep it from shifting under normal driving conditions. In a crash they will stretch too much and then break.
Even in a moderate crash it's easy to experience a force of 10Gs.
Are your bundee cords strong enough to support the force equivalent to the mass of 10 civic trasmissions?

I suggest Cargo Tie Down Straps available where ever they sell hitches and trailer parts.
I have these and they are very strong and tighten easily to hold cargo very securely:
http://www.canadiantire.ca/browse/product_detail.jsp?PRODUCT<>prd_id=845524443281477&FOLDER<>folder_id=1408474396672513&bmUID=1163785035635
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Guillermo said:
mrredrocker said:
plywood, bungee cords, and a short plastic container in the back.
Not bungee cords!
They are only adequate to keep it from shifting under normal driving conditions. In a crash they will stretch too much and then break.
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Right, I don't know why I said bungee. I made the trip today, and it was a smooth one. I overestimated the weight of the transmission by about 200% so weight wasn't an issue. The only problem I'll have is getting that gear oil smell out of the cabin this week. Thanks for all the help, everyone!
 

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mrredrocker said:
The only problem I'll have is getting that gear oil smell out of the cabin this week. Thanks for all the help, everyone!
Try using dryer sheets, placed liberally throughout the cabin.

Cheers,
Cameron
 
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