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Discussion Starter #1
My car has the dreaded wet seat belt syndrome and I know I'll have to fit new moulding clips sooner or later.
I'm currently avoiding the problem by parking with the rear end facing down the slope of my front yard (no garage) which keeps the belts fairly dry but of course the water is still getting in to the car and settling somewhere.

Went for a drive this morning and found that the steering wheel, gear stick, dash, seats, pretty much everything felt wet.
After driving for a few miles the instrument cluster started to fog up from the inside.

I checked the carpet and trim expecting lots of water but nothing found.

Does anyone know if there is a drain in the box sections around the floor area or is it a case of removing trim and mopping out?

Thanks
 

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Get a proper electric dehumidifier and stick it inside the car for 24hrs to suck the moisture out...
Then fix the leaky pillar/roof trim..
 

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I feel your pain. I just brought my first new used insight home last week to Portland Or.
I had three days before the winter rains started up again in earnest. I had no idea what shape the invisible parts of the above door moldings were in. I decide on plan B. I bought a two tubes of black silicone seal ( my insight is dark Blue ). I bought some good painters masking tape 1” wide. First I used a rag soaked in alcohol and cleaned and wiped the seams carefully, and let it dry. I carefully masked the four odd seams from the top of the windsheild
To the top of the rear hatch. The long one to the back of the door, the short transverse one there. And the two roughly 7-8 inch ones from their back. Did it carefully so only the gaps showed and the paint was protected. I had on hand: a quart can of mineral spirits, a roll of paper towels. A painters putty knife. A box cutter, Some chop sticks. Some shishkabab skewers, a round pencil. ( the last three for fairing the bead of chalk.)
The tubes of caulk may be for use in a caulk gun. Fine if you have used one. If not get tubes
From your hardware store that look like toothpaste tubes. They will come with a nozzle that screws on to the tube after it is opened. Puncture the seal on the end of the tube. Attach th nozzle. Cut the nozzle for the narrower of your seams.
Work slowly and carefully. Do the short narrow seams at the back first. Do one at a time.
You will try to apply a thick enough bead to fill the seam. Try as you apply the bead to force it into the seam. At the very least cover the seam with as neat a bead as you can. As soon as the bead has been applied pick the chopstick, kebab stick. Pencil, whatever seems to match the size of the gap you are working on best. In one slow careful pull. Pull the stick at a low angle along the bead once or twice. To force the caulk into the gap and fare it to a nice curve at the same time. Wipe the stick each pull. Carefully clean off the excess from the tape around the seam and leave it and don’t go back and mess with it again. It is easy to overwork the silicone seal. Move on to the next and wider seams. Small messes are easily wiped up by a mineral spirit soaked corner of paper towel, Cut the nozzle for a wider bead as needed. When all the seams are done check for gaps or holes use the sticks to carefully fill these. Once again trying not to over work them. When this is done.slowly pull the tape being carefull not to let the tape touch anything. The silicone seal will start to set up quickly an seal your car immediately. It will fully cure almost over night. Though you can drive your car almost right away. My insight hasn’t leaked a drop in the last week of heavy rains. The calk is nearly invisible.
 

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My car has the dreaded wet seat belt syndrome and I know I'll have to fit new moulding clips sooner or later.
I'm currently avoiding the problem by parking with the rear end facing down the slope of my front yard (no garage) which keeps the belts fairly dry but of course the water is still getting in to the car and settling somewhere.

Went for a drive this morning and found that the steering wheel, gear stick, dash, seats, pretty much everything felt wet.
After driving for a few miles the instrument cluster started to fog up from the inside.

I checked the carpet and trim expecting lots of water but nothing found.

Does anyone know if there is a drain in the box sections around the floor area or is it a case of removing trim and mopping out?

Thanks
My car leaked at the roof skin joint under the top of the hatchback as well as the clip under the pillar trim. The water was quite deep in the area either side behind the panel that goes across the car behind the seats. Effectively between the door and the rear wheelarch. To dry it out I removed all of the boot/ trunk liner. Quite dry under the spare wheel. Removed the panels and pads either side of the battery / IMA box and removed the panel behind the seats. Quite a lot of work but not difficult once the seats are out. There are foam pads in these spaces which soak up the water and would take forever to dry out in position. Empty the "bilges" with a sponge and then leave a dehumidifier in the car.

I fixed all of my leaks with builder's silicone four years ago and it's been bone dry in there since. I know silicone is considered to be a bit of a bodge but if everything is clean and dry when you apply it....... well it has worked for me.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Thanks very much for your helpful replies.

I am considering a plan of action using good old bath sealant :badgrin:

As mentioned above, silicone sealant works well and is relatively cheap compared to the eye-watering price of the Honda clips ( I'm as poor as a church mouse)

I'll strip out the interior (cheers Rory) as it seems like the only way to get to the root of the problem.
 

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Thanks very much for your helpful replies.

I am considering a plan of action using good old bath sealant :badgrin:

As mentioned above, silicone sealant works well and is relatively cheap compared to the eye-watering price of the Honda clips ( I'm as poor as a church mouse)

I'll strip out the interior (cheers Rory) as it seems like the only way to get to the root of the problem.
When restoring my Insight I had the headliner out, and observed that the roof seam beneath the thin plastic strip which starts at the back end of the windshield/door molding and ends at the rear hatch, was cracked and leaking. I removed the plastic strip and the metal tangs holding it in, sealed the seam, and then put the tangs back in with double-sided molding tape, then pressed the plastic strips back in.
 

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Thanks very much for your helpful replies.

I am considering a plan of action using good old bath sealant :badgrin:

As mentioned above, silicone sealant works well and is relatively cheap compared to the eye-watering price of the Honda clips ( I'm as poor as a church mouse)

I'll strip out the interior (cheers Rory) as it seems like the only way to get to the root of the problem.
I purchased the clips via a link somewhere in this website, a USA supplier, vastly cheaper than Honda UK and the clips were perfect. (Unlike the eBay/UK sourced clips for a Ford Transit)

Link was probably in the "wet seatbelt" thread or the other leak thread about the roof seam. Do read everything about how to remove that roof pillar trim and how it comes off. I cut through each clip with a sharpened paint scraper, wrapped in tape to protect paint and wacked with a rubber hammer.

good luck!
 

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Discussion Starter #10
I forgot to mention that bath sealant contains vinegar (acid) which can lead to corrosion. When sealing a steel vehicle it can lead to rust.
That's a good point. I wonder if it stays acidic after it has dried/set.
 

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That's a good point. I wonder if it stays acidic after it has dried/set.
No it doesn't, once cured it is really pretty inert. However, there are plenty of silicones available which specifically don't use acetic acid. They are much used in electronics etc. Check out Dow Corning products, not difficult to get even here in UK.
 

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