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Arriving home I discovered one wheel skirt of my 04 separated from all mount points and being held on only by the fasteners. I think I even know where it happened, because there was a tremendous pothole BANG...

What I don't know is whether the wheel skirt was attached properly. I have observed even some Insight owners don't know how to make sure the middle fasteners are engaged. It is possible that the the wheel pants were not replaced properly after a recent safety inspection. Another thing to remember - remove wheel pants for the inspector (I forgot to do it this time.)
 

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Arriving home I discovered one wheel skirt of my 04 separated from all mount points and being held on only by the fasteners. I think I even know where it happened, because there was a tremendous pothole BANG...

What I don't know is whether the wheel skirt was attached properly. I have observed even some Insight owners don't know how to make sure the middle fasteners are engaged. It is possible that the the wheel pants were not replaced properly after a recent safety inspection. Another thing to remember - remove wheel pants for the inspector (I forgot to do it this time.)
 

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I would say it was not installed properly. (Not inserted, over the tabs)
 

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This is the link I bought from: CBK0101SS - 00-04 Honda Insight; Complete Brake Line Kit; Stainless I felt it a good price compared to oem steel lines. The problem is that you need to remove tank and related connected items to get at the lines. I saw rust on my gas line as well. I don't know just how bad it is but I would definitely coat them with something. You really need to put car up on ramps to get under and see all there is to see but search threads here, I'm sure there is plenty of info to read. I haven't finished yet trying to install my lines. I have removed them and perhaps a little at a time I will get to finishing the car.
 

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Arriving home I discovered one wheel skirt of my 04 separated from all mount points and being held on only by the fasteners. I think I even know where it happened, because there was a tremendous pothole BANG...

What I don't know is whether the wheel skirt was attached properly. I have observed even some Insight owners don't know how to make sure the middle fasteners are engaged. It is possible that the the wheel pants were not replaced properly after a recent safety inspection. Another thing to remember - remove wheel pants for the inspector (I forgot to do it this time.)
The tabs bend out and get loose. I had same issues. I pushed tabs in and haven't had an issue after that.The bottom part may have bent from hanging out like that as well. They should stay up without inserting lag bolts or whatever those things are called.
 

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Installed H4-HLAW LED headlights (superbriteled.com) - much better than the stock halogen. Easy to install, but the rubber boot isn't compatible with the heatsink on the LED - any thoughts on that?

Also, the LED I got is dual color. I think I misclicked on the order. Low beam is 6000k, high beam is 3000K, lower lumen for fog/rain. Total surprise when I tested the lights! Anybody have experience/thoughts on dual color lights? I'm not sure I can or should try to return them after I installed.
 

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I put my second 2000 m/t on the road and drove it for 200 miles to work today. It doesn’t seem to have as much power as my other one. It hasn’t been registered since 2013 or something like that. Little jerking now and then changed coils and egr. Still a little funny. Pending code of p0172. Checked A/F sensor (within limits according to book at .5 volts at 3 thousand rpm. Have to check fuel pressure and EVAP valve. I think cat might be partially clogged going to put tester on it and check. Otherwise not too bad.
 

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Checked A/F sensor (within limits according to book at .5 volts at 3 thousand rpm.
TL;DR: such a test may detect a completely failed sensor but not a contaminated sensor.

How many miles are on the car? I'm not an A/F sensor expert. But I did a lot of reading and experimenting in this area last year.

They gradually get contaminated. I could not think of a way to properly test them short of putting them into a two-bung exhaust next to a known good one. (They apparently make gas with known amounts of oxygen for calibration of sensors used on dynos, for formal emissions testing, etc.)

Also, if you decide to replace, the REASON you want to stick with the NGK called out for the 2000-2001 (Denso for late 2001-2006 - the ECUs also have a correspondingly different circuit), or stick with a Honda-sourced part, and not go with an aftermarket sensor, is that the sensors for the MT are especially wideband because so few (none?) other cars have operating regimes at such high air/fuel ratios. So the "replacement" sensors are just as likely to be intended for "ordinary" cars INCLUDING the CVT which does not do lean burn.

When these less-than-super-wideband sensors are put into manual transmission Insight which needs the super-wideband sensor, then when the car tries to enter lean burn, it will actually decelerate as it tries to lean the fuel further and further while the ECU looks to the LAF sensor to know when the proper air fuel ratio has been obtained. The sensor can never get there, the ECU eventually gives up, and drops back to stoich, and the car gets a sudden burst of power. If the car battery was pulled to reset the ECU when the sensor was installed, the car will actually seem to run great for up to a few dozen miles/minutes while it uses pre-programmed values for injector pulse width and does not rely on the LAF sensor while it is learning its characteristics. But after this, the weird behavior will start.

(Some cheaper sensors may in fact be the proper NGK or Denso sensor repackaged, but there is no way to tell for sure, and forum expreience suggests that arbitrary cheap sensors are not likely to work.)

(In fact, you may find a Bosch part listed as compatible for the late 2001+ MT, but in fact this is a mistake and it probably is only for the CVT (it's a repackaged Denso, the OEM brand for late 2001+, that physically matches the sensor in the CVT. But I digress.)

As long as your engine is not burning lots of oil and not burning coolant and you're avoiding certain additives, any of which may contaminate a new sensor, it won't hurt to replace the sensor with an NGK (2000-2001) or Denso (late 2001-2006) if the car has 100,000+ miles on it. However, you might not notice a difference if (1) there are other issues and (2) if you don't disconnect the battery and allow the car to re-learn operating parameters.

Other simpler things include an IMA battery that has one or more sticks whose voltage is different enough from the rest that the car reduces the amount of current used for assist, without throwing a code. I have such a pack. It does not do thsi all the time, and I don't understand the triggers, but it seems to occur shortly after engine start before the cells have an opportunity to balance after self-discharge, or when especially high assist is demanded causing the weak stick pair to dip past the threshold in voltage.

I don't think you mentioned a valve adjustment which can also make a difference.

I think the manual recommends replacing all oxygen sensors at the same time. I did not do this; I have a new LAFsensor and old downstream sensors. I also am throwing an emissions-related code now. So take my advice with a grain of salt. Others believe that the downstream sensors only measure the effectivess of the catalytic converter, but nobody has examined the actual ECU firmware, and it differs significantly in this respect between the early and later cars. I am thinking of replacing the remaining sensors for this reason before declaring my catalytic converter a problem.
I think cat might be partially clogged
This is mentioned in a number of threads and may be overrated. I Ithought this might be a problem with mine too, but I don't at this point. One of my cats may be clogged, but not the top one. A cheap borescope inserted in the oxygen sensor hole is a quick way to determine this. The honeycomb will be readily visible.

If you enjoy zipping onto freeway onramps in second gear like I do, pulling lots of power at 5000 RPM, then your catalytic converters are probably fine.
 

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TL;DR: such a test may detect a completely failed sensor but not a contaminated sensor.

How many miles are on the car? I'm not an A/F sensor expert. But I did a lot of reading and experimenting in this area last year.

They gradually get contaminated. I could not think of a way to properly test them short of putting them into a two-bung exhaust next to a known good one. (They apparently make gas with known amounts of oxygen for calibration of sensors used on dynos, for formal emissions testing, etc.)

Also, if you decide to replace, the REASON you want to stick with the NGK called out for the 2000-2001 (Denso for late 2001-2006 - the ECUs also have a correspondingly different circuit), or stick with a Honda-sourced part, and not go with an aftermarket sensor, is that the sensors for the MT are especially wideband because so few (none?) other cars have operating regimes at such high air/fuel ratios. So the "replacement" sensors are just as likely to be intended for "ordinary" cars INCLUDING the CVT which does not do lean burn.

When these less-than-super-wideband sensors are put into manual transmission Insight which needs the super-wideband sensor, then when the car tries to enter lean burn, it will actually decelerate as it tries to lean the fuel further and further while the ECU looks to the LAF sensor to know when the proper air fuel ratio has been obtained. The sensor can never get there, the ECU eventually gives up, and drops back to stoich, and the car gets a sudden burst of power. If the car battery was pulled to reset the ECU when the sensor was installed, the car will actually seem to run great for up to a few dozen miles/minutes while it uses pre-programmed values for injector pulse width and does not rely on the LAF sensor while it is learning its characteristics. But after this, the weird behavior will start.

(Some cheaper sensors may in fact be the proper NGK or Denso sensor repackaged, but there is no way to tell for sure, and forum expreience suggests that arbitrary cheap sensors are not likely to work.)

(In fact, you may find a Bosch part listed as compatible for the late 2001+ MT, but in fact this is a mistake and it probably is only for the CVT (it's a repackaged Denso, the OEM brand for late 2001+, that physically matches the sensor in the CVT. But I digress.)

As long as your engine is not burning lots of oil and not burning coolant and you're avoiding certain additives, any of which may contaminate a new sensor, it won't hurt to replace the sensor with an NGK (2000-2001) or Denso (late 2001-2006) if the car has 100,000+ miles on it. However, you might not notice a difference if (1) there are other issues and (2) if you don't disconnect the battery and allow the car to re-learn operating parameters.

Other simpler things include an IMA battery that has one or more sticks whose voltage is different enough from the rest that the car reduces the amount of current used for assist, without throwing a code. I have such a pack. It does not do thsi all the time, and I don't understand the triggers, but it seems to occur shortly after engine start before the cells have an opportunity to balance after self-discharge, or when especially high assist is demanded causing the weak stick pair to dip past the threshold in voltage.

I don't think you mentioned a valve adjustment which can also make a difference.

I think the manual recommends replacing all oxygen sensors at the same time. I did not do this; I have a new LAFsensor and old downstream sensors. I also am throwing an emissions-related code now. So take my advice with a grain of salt. Others believe that the downstream sensors only measure the effectivess of the catalytic converter, but nobody has examined the actual ECU firmware, and it differs significantly in this respect between the early and later cars. I am thinking of replacing the remaining sensors for this reason before declaring my catalytic converter a problem.

This is mentioned in a number of threads and may be overrated. I Ithought this might be a problem with mine too, but I don't at this point. One of my cats may be clogged, but not the top one. A cheap borescope inserted in the oxygen sensor hole is a quick way to determine this. The honeycomb will be readily visible.

If you enjoy zipping onto freeway onramps in second gear like I do, pulling lots of power at 5000 RPM, then your catalytic converters are probably fine.
Thank you. The car has 177000 miles on it and it doesn’t seem to burn oil. I will look down there with a cheap bore scope and new 02 sensor. They are just so expensive for these cars.
 

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I dropped a bunch of money on a proper set of class 0 linesman gloves, protectors, and an "ALWAYS WEAR YOUR GLOVES" bag so that I can work on my IMA battery without killing myself. Anyone who cracks the IMA enclosure should google for hybrid service safety measures and see what the real mechanics do.
 

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I installed the missing battery switch safety cover and fasteners of the IMA case that the dealer omitted years ago. Car gained a couple grams. I installed the super bee IMA this time.

Replaced the 20 year old Sony red xplode speakers with Polka DB652’s and XTC 2 3/8” baffles.

Replaced back seat net fastener covers and some other trim fasteners to keep the pillars and garnishes tight.
 

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Ordered 4 RE 92's from Costco. Oil change and trans service (CVT) Honda 0-20 and Honda CVT fluid, Honda Oil filter (MIJ). Redo front brakes (clean and lube caliper pins and corrected the dust boots). Cleaned brake hardware and applied proper grease to shims etc. Good visual inspection. Ordered 1500.00 in parts from Honda lol. Just got this car last week and its pretty neat.
 

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$1500 in parts. Hmmm, maybe I should just get a new bottom cover panel instead of limping along with the old warped one... :)
 

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$1500 in parts. Hmmm, maybe I should just get a new bottom cover panel instead of limping along with the old warped one... :)
I say go for it! (don't listen to me...I just ordered another 300.00 from rock auto lol).
 

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Gee, I thought I was spendy paying $90 for a junkyard unit to replace my cracked driver’s side mirror. Then again, that is 18% of what I paid for the whole car, so it is a significant investment. :^)

If you enjoy the car, spend the money and don’t worry about it. You decide the value to you. Have fun!
 

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Gee, I thought I was spendy paying $90 for a junkyard unit to replace my cracked driver’s side mirror. Then again, that is 18% of what I paid for the whole car, so it is a significant investment. :^)

If you enjoy the car, spend the money and don’t worry about it. You decide the value to you. Have fun!
!00% keeping it fun. I have an OCD thing when it comes to OEM parts on any car I have. I'm totally aware there are absolutely no returns on this car. I've wanted one for so long that the money has not bothered me too much....yet!!! It's getting close though lol.
 

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I got mine, a 2001, for a pretty good price and it was in pretty good condition. Nevertheless I drove it down to Scott at Hue Motors for a complete going over, GAZ shocks and Scott's rear springs. It was a day and one half of work by Scott and his assistants. Did it cost? Yes. Was it a good idea? You'd better believe it. I am a little old now for crawling under cars and spinning wrenches so I took it to the best for a checkover and upgrade. I left Scott and drove to the east coast and back without a worry. The sweet little car never missed a beat. This is not a concours car but it is mechanically solid.

It is not neccessary that all cars get this treatment. The Insight is quirky, yes, but it is also a reliable and rugged car. Treat it well and you will be paid back and then some. I sure love mine and it is a joy to drive. 55MPG winter, 65MPG summer. Yes!
 

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I got mine, a 2001, for a pretty good price and it was in pretty good condition. Nevertheless I drove it down to Scott at Hue Motors for a complete going over, GAZ shocks and Scott's rear springs. It was a day and one half of work by Scott and his assistants. Did it cost? Yes. Was it a good idea? You'd better believe it. I am a little old now for crawling under cars and spinning wrenches so I took it to the best for a checkover and upgrade. I left Scott and drove to the east coast and back without a worry. The sweet little car never missed a beat. This is not a concours car but it is mechanically solid.

It is not neccessary that all cars get this treatment. The Insight is quirky, yes, but it is also a reliable and rugged car. Treat it well and you will be paid back and then some. I sure love mine and it is a joy to drive. 55MPG winter, 65MPG summer. Yes!
I'd like to get the GAZ shocks and and springs too. I'm interested in the under panels/diffuser as well.
 

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I'd like to get the GAZ shocks and and springs too. I'm interested in the under panels/diffuser as well.
I forgot to say that Scott installed his aluminum underpanel, too. Scott probably knows more about these cars than anyone in the country. His suggestions for shocks and springs are the result of a lot of experience driving, owning, repairing and maintaining the G1's. My 2001 handles and rides better. Scott is The Insight Whisperer.
 
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