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Did the roof clip seal last week while it was still warm-ish. Be sure you watch Scott’s (klr3cyl) instruction videos.

Removal...

Install...

The clips themselves were about $40. Following the instructions in the videos, it was an easy-peasy job that took less than two hours.

I did discover that the bottom tab that hooks under the fender bolt is easier to deal with if you loosen the bolt. It’s (shock & surprise) a 10mm wrench.

- Park

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2006 Red CVT Insight
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54 Posts

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2006 Red CVT Insight
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54 Posts
Did the roof clip seal last week while it was still warm-ish. Be sure you watch Scott’s (klr3cyl) instruction videos.

Removal...

Install...

The clips themselves were about $40. Following the instructions in the videos, it was an easy-peasy job that took less than two hours.

I did discover that the bottom tab that hooks under the fender bolt is easier to deal with if you loosen the bolt. It’s (shock & surprise) a 10mm wrench.

- Park

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I'm gonna have to tackle this soon. I have to paint the roof and these trim pieces. Nice work!
 
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Went up Hurricane Ridge today, Olympic National Park just south of downtown Port Angeles, Washington.
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So quiet and clean up here.
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I had 142 miles on this tank getting 63.7 mpg and it dropped to 56.7 mpg where I parked at the top.

Now back home posting, it’s back up to 62.8 mpg for the tank after the 36 mile R/T.

The outing reminds me, I still need to install the brake and clutch switches, so I can brake-recharge without braking, and charge-off while hill climbing.
 

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My old racing buddy up in Maryland invited me up for a repair/maint. session in his huge home garage, with lift. We were able to replace the rear motor mount, a damaged rear bumper cover, and the fuel and brake lines. A professional mechanic, he even loves to work on interesting cars in his spare time.
 

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My old racing buddy up in Maryland invited me up for a repair/maint. session in his huge home garage, with lift. We were able to replace the rear motor mount, a damaged rear bumper cover, and the fuel and brake lines. A professional mechanic, he even loves to work on interesting cars in his spare time.
How was replacing the fuel and brake lines? seems like a pain in the butt. How long did it take to do the lines?
 

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My old racing buddy up in Maryland invited me up for a repair/maint. session in his huge home garage, with lift. We were able to replace the rear motor mount, a damaged rear bumper cover, and the fuel and brake lines. A professional mechanic, he even loves to work on interesting cars in his spare time.
Where did you get the brake lines? I've used stainless steel hardline kits from inlinetube.com on a 96 F250 and a 02 Malibu with great results, but they don't make one for our Insights :(
 

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Where did you get the brake lines? I've used stainless steel hardline kits from inlinetube.com on a 96 F250 and a 02 Malibu with great results, but they don't make one for our Insights :(
$10 says he got those fancy nickle copper lines and pre-bent them all himself
 

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How was replacing the fuel and brake lines? seems like a pain in the butt. How long did it take to do the lines?
It is a major job for sure. You have to remove the right side aero panel and worse, you have to drop the exhaust system and fuel tank. A lift makes a huge difference. In addition, some of the fittings are a bit difficult to reach, particular in the engine compartment.

My friend is a professional mechanic and shop owner. He really knows how to manipulate the long lines, including bending slightly in a few spots to manipulate them, without removing a lot of small stuff. It took mostly him around 3 hours to get the lines installed and another hour of my time to button up the loose ends.

I took the lines off my donor car which was an exceptionally rust free on the steel parts. It was a CA car for several years, was totalled 3 times and spent a lot of time in in yards and body shops, and at the end was owned by a VA friend who did not drive it in the winter. The lines were pristine. I probably should have fixed the minor deer body damage he had, but I wanted the carpet and the covered seats in the worst sort of way for my conversion citrus.

There is an option which should probably be considered. My friend just finished a VW Beetle restoration. He used copper line. It has the advantage that it is soft enough to bend by hand. One could use the originals for reference, make one end flare end, and easily duplicate the original routing foot by foot.
 

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Last week I re-did my headlights. About an hour and a half per light, but the results were worth it.

Headlights:
Wet-sand by hand w/ 1500 grit sandpaper
Then, using a microfibre towel:
3M Perfect-It Rubbing Compound
Meguiar's Ultimate Liquid Wax

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The trick with the lights is you gotta make sure all the yellow discolouration is really actually gone. Once the whole headlight is such that any additional sanding only removes white particles, that's when you're ready. I did the driver's lamp first, and I had to re-do it because I wasn't thorough enough and some discolouration was still there, even though it was hard to see. When I did the passenger light I was able to get it all on the first attempt because I was paying more attention to whether or not yellowish particles were still coming off.



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Later, on the weekend I got the car washed, and then I hand waxed the entire car. It took me forever, but it came out looking better than I though it would.


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Beautiful! Except that it is too pretty to drive. Now you'll have to skate to work.

Sam
 
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2002 Monte Carlo Blue CVT
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320 Posts
A prior owner opted for a different strategy than cutting the aluminum bar that runs across the back of the glove box. Instead, he left the right hand attachment bolt off and just pivoted the bar out of the way. That has made it a little tough for me to get the glove box back in, but it may not matter for now since I'll probably go back in and take the squirrel cage fan out for cleaning.
 

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2002 Monte Carlo Blue CVT
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320 Posts
So as part 2 of my cabin filter project, I removed the climate fan (thanks to acrazyjohnny for the suggestion). Removed the dried grass matted into the fan and scrubbed fan vanes with a toothbrush to remove caked on dust.

Where the fan could previously have been described as anemic, now it could blow my glasses off.

The difference is night and day.

Highly recommend that you make this a part of your cabin filter change regimen if that change shows evidence of critters in the filter space.

Three screws (T25 torx head) and one electrical connector and the fan is free. You do not need to remove the glove box to get at it, as it sits underneath the dash. Working space to the forward-most T25 is tight.
 

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2002 Monte Carlo Blue CVT
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320 Posts
Changed a pretty nasty engine air cleaner and vacuumed the acorn husks out of the air cleaner housing. Engine air flow should be much improved. Wondering whether I'll see improved MPG.

Down to 48.4 with the onset of colder weather and winter formula gas from around 52.
 
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