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I also cut one round and a half off the front springs. That reduced a little more weight.
A little less air goes under the car. But here’s another thing.
Semi truckasauris I slow the truck down empty going to Vulcan about 77 to 80 mile trip maybe sometimes 90 depending on location i return to.Going slow 65 TopSpeed slowing down to 55 climbing hills.Truck has a scan gauge to show how much fuel you’re using when a good time to let up on the accelerant. 9 1/2 miles to the gallon empty. After getting 24 Tons -Drive back go 75 miles an hour down hill keep the truck in Top Gear. Climb the hills truck lose the speed to 65 sometimes 60 on taller hills. Was able to get 8 miles to the gallon loaded going back. Trying to use momentum to get the hills.
that truck when it is going 50 miles an hour empty is 1000 RPMs. My car when it is going to 50 -Miles per hour 2000 RPMs. I still think that’s why cars use so much more fuel than trucks when you compare the weight. Our cars are geared way too low.
 

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Another way to look at it. The truck holds 100 gallons of diesel. If you get 8.2 miles per gallon round-trip you’re gonna go 800 miles till empty.

The other people that drive this truck when I am not available get between four and 5 miles to gallon. On the same trip. Can you imagine how much heat the radiator is called on to get rid of. i’m using way less fuel climbing hills because I’m slowing down. And I’ll let gravity assist build my speed back up going down hills. It’s hard to hold 80,000 pounds back going downhill.That’s what the truck weighs loaded if it is more than that I have to take a spade and dig it off.
I get better diesel mileage with the truck fully loaded than other people do with the truck empty gouging to go faster uphill and driving 80 miles an hour using the CB
 

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NathanC - Haul-n-Hypermiler.
 
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50 seconds. That's me, right there, at 48 mph...
 
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Replaced the primary O2 sensor just because. She really didn't appreciate it on the first trip but warmed up to it on the way back. I had bought the other 2 ages ago and haven't installed them. Now i can't find them :(
 

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2001 5S "Turbo"
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Installing a new primary O2 sensor, the vehicle has to relearn your driving, so it will act "weird" for a while. #2 and #3 only have to be replaced if you have a problem. (CEL)
 

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Exactly Willie, think of post cat o2 sensors as watchdogs. All they do is report, they don't have an input into mixture formation.

On topic, got the 01 civic koni inserts put into some g1 insight front shocks. Minor modification required, nothing out of the scope of possible considering the mods required to install the inserts.
 

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Dont use that theory as fact @Drtye . Several makes and models use rear o2 readings to set the 'desired' or 'goal' for the front o2 to achieve. I constantly hear "rear o2 is only for cat monitoring" or "it does nothing for fuel calculations" and its just honestly wrong. Yes most makes dont depend on rear o2 readings, but again, some depend heavily on rear o2 readings and if the rear o2 fails it can put the car into limp mode or make it not run at all. I used to subscribe to the "rear o2 does nothing" stuff but have since thrown it away when i had countless mercedes and dodge cars go crazy when their rear o2 isnt operating properly. This was first hand experience thus i know this as fact. I now treat rear o2s as just as important as front regardless of make or model and it has proved to bear fruit.
 

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Dont use that theory as fact @Drtye . Several makes and models use rear o2 readings to set the 'desired' or 'goal' for the front o2 to achieve. I constantly hear "rear o2 is only for cat monitoring" or "it does nothing for fuel calculations" and its just honestly wrong. Yes most makes dont depend on rear o2 readings, but again, some depend heavily on rear o2 readings and if the rear o2 fails it can put the car into limp mode or make it not run at all. I used to subscribe to the "rear o2 does nothing" stuff but have since thrown it away when i had countless mercedes and dodge cars go crazy when their rear o2 isnt operating properly. This was first hand experience thus i know this as fact. I now treat rear o2s as just as important as front regardless of make or model and it has proved to bear fruit.
You are absolutely correct. I should have been more specific. Rear O2 sensors won't bear a direct input to mixture formation on a correctly running engine (think short term fuel trim). However faults with them can and will affect running and driveability. Like you mentioned, mercedes uses them to help target long term fuel trims, cat efficiency, and depending on the situation, mixture formation (if it suspects a faulty exhaust component in trying to narrow down the defective part). The old mixture formation or cat efficiency codes are wonderful to try and diagnose when there is a lazy sensor. It's like throwing a dart sometimes onto the parts catalog. Soo many variables. Limp mode doesn't help anything with diag either.
 

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I've got a couple of weeks of "what did you do to your Insight today" to catch up on. I'm making small improvements on Lazarus, the high-mileage, twice-totaled Citrus I bought from North Carolina a few weeks ago.

I'm also doing some parts swaps with my silver Insight, and some general clean-up, in preparation for selling it.

I'm really getting into things...

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(Seriously, who knew there was enough space to stand in there with the spare tire out?!)

This was in the process of swapping batteries between the two cars. Both have old Honda IMA batteries. After doing a series of deep charge/discharge cycles on the Citrus, it was clear the Citrus battery still didn't have the endurance of my silver car. So I spent a day swapping batteries. That's a ridiculous number of 10mm bolts to remove.

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Thanks to Bumblebee for the EXCELLENT how-to video. @Eli nailed every single detail...

One tweak I've developed... I pirate 10mm bolts from the surround aluminum panels, replacing them with the Torx-head bolts used in parts of the cover. That way, the next time I need to remove the battery cover it's all 10mm bolts, except the 8mm safety bolt by the master switch.

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Then there were two days spent swapping out speakers.

This car has the original Honda cassette head unit. I'm using a Bluetooth FM transmitter to send audio from my phone to the car. It works great but didn't sound great. Probably because of the original, 21-year old paper speakers in the doors.

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Which I swapped out for drop-in replacements from Crutchfield. It's been a long time since I've done car audio, but Crutchfield is still cream of the crop in service. They provided a detailed install sheet specifically for the G1 Insight.

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These 2-way polypropylene speakers fit right in. With the factory speaker grilles installed, your eyes will never know... but your ears sure will!

In the process of doing the battery swap, I discovered someone had installed rear paper speakers but never cut openings in the carpet?! Honestly, you couldn't even tell they were back there because they were so muffled.

I took out the old speakers and traced the hole on the back of the batting. When I started cutting, I found the batting stretched and the line was hard to follow, so I marked radiants around the edge to help guide my knife. With a sharp utility knife and short strokes, it was easy to cut the batting and the carpet from the back.

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The new rear speakers are cheap-ish Sony's from Walmart, because I didn't plan on this upgrade when I ordered from Crutchfield. Still, they add to the quality of sound in the car. The Crutchfield install guide includes the wiring color codes for every part of the system, so it was easy to sort the + and - for each speaker and solder in the new leads.

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Then there was a day when I tackled under-hood cleanup. It looked nasty before I started...

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Actually in this photo I've already scrubbed down the surfaces below with soapy water and a kitchen scrubby pad. Believe me, it's much improved. Everything was filthy with a light mix of oil and dirt or dust. You can still see the grunge around the edges of the hood. And that hood pad... ick.

The hood pad is held in place with a lot of large plastic rivets. I used a special spade tool to pry them out - cheap from the auto store and very useful. I also used needle nose pliers to squeeze/pry the clips for the washer hose out, and gently twist the hose off the two washer nipples.

Behind the pad I found bugs nests, more dirt, and those pernicious NC pin oak leaves that get everywhere. I washed the bottom of the hood down with soapy water and rinsed.

Then I beat the pad itself firmly with a broom to knock off the worst of the dust and cobwebs. Next I gently scrubbed both sides with a soapy wet rag, then with a clean wet rag. The pad looked worse than it really was. The difference is astonishing...

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Reinstalling the pad, I found the plastic rivets felt good enough for one more use. If I repeat this, I'll probably buy new rivets as the old ones break a little bit every time they are removed.

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Yet another day spent swapping rear valance panels. Honda really didn't want that bit of plastic to come off. There are six plastic push rivets in the bottom, two bolts on each side under the skirts, four plastic tabs at the top edge, and seven screws under the lip inside. With the plastic rivets pulled (most broke) and the bolts removed, I could flex the valance enough to squeeze an arm in and remove the screws. There are two different kids of screws in there?! You can see the green tabs hanging down from the bumper for the screws.

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I found it was easiest to reach most of them from the exhaust side, where the valance is already cut out somewhat.

Those bolts under the wheel skirts are special. The top bolt pins both the bumper and the valance down and has a taller ridge under the bolt head than the lower bolt. These bolts fit into threads captive in the brackets, and I found one on the green car had broken off previously. On the silver car, the inset nut broke loose and spun in the bracket for one bolt; when I gripped it with vice grips it became apparent the threaded sleeve was aluminum and had bonded with the bolt. Despite PB Blaster and care, this bolt ended up snapping off too. Be careful with these!

Reinstallation worked best for me starting with the center screw, then working toward the edges, reinstalling the bolts at the ends, then installing (or replacing) the plastic rivets underneath.

After two weeks of stealing a day here and there, I was finally able to put the rear skirts back on yesterday morning. On the Citrus, the original plastic quick fasteners for the skirts are long gone. Someone replaced them with 10mm fender bolts. These work okay but are obviously prone to rust. I'll probably switch back to the original style fastener, which makes it easier to service a flat tire anyway.

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The car looks SO much better with the skirts on. I've been driving around for two weeks with what felt like a "naked" Insight.

More to do, but nice to be making progress, one day off at a time. Grateful for the spring weather here in Wisconsin, since the garage is still full of my son's K(car) engine swap project.

- Park
 

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"Lazarus" made the cut, eh?
Yep. Once that name was suggested, there really wasn't any debate on a car that's been totaled and resurrected twice.

It's interesting digging into the nooks and crannies, where I'm spotting evidence of repair and where I'm not seeing damage that I would have expected.

Panel fitment around the rear driver's quarter, bumper, and skirt is wonky. One edge of the hood has been glued or goo'd underneath, though it isn't visible up top. The front bottom of the spare tire well has been beaten back into shape. The driver's front fender was probably originally red before being repainted to match the Citrus car.

But the front and rear bumper beams, subframes, etc show no obvious evidence of damage that I've seen yet.

Per the Carfax, the early accident was a rollover and I would have expected to see more general damage. But the guy who bought it on salvage title back then owned a body shop, and perhaps did more thorough repairs. The later accident was a side impact, and I think that's where I'm seeing the lower quality patch jobs on the driver's side.

Car runs and drive great, so I'm happy putting some time and effort into it.

- Park
 

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"...the early accident was a rollover and I would have expected to see more general damage."

A buddy of mine rolled a 2-month-old Honda Crosstour at extremely slow speed when his passenger front tire dug into a deep pile of fine gravel on a turn off the shoulder of a road at a construction site. Ended up completely upside-down, "like in the movies," he said. Minor denting on passenger fender and scuffs in the side and roof paint.
 
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I installed Vredestein tires today. I hear mpg is pretty much the same. My main reason was looking for less noise.
I got 65k miles from my RE92's with probably 5k left. I kept them inflated to 40psi and ill do the same with these new tires.
 

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2002 Insight 5MT A/C
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90386

Polished the wheels. Meguiar's 2 step polish with a random orbital polisher. Looking very nice and shiny now.

Anyone know some way to get rid of the corrosion? I'm not too pressed about it. But all I could find on it required painting the wheels and/or smoothing out the original diamond cut surface... Neither things I want to do. Rather have slightly dingy but original looking wheels, lol.
 

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The only thing I know of is to send them to a wheel shop and have the faces recut.

I fixed the blue passenger pillar connector, its nice having a working hatch release handle.
 

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I checked my a/c. The system seemed to be in an overpressure state (thanks to a prior owner/mechanic). Some freon leaked out and I then had to add a bit, but it seems to be working much better. The compressor actually comes on, which I don't think it was doing before.
 
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