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I bought a 2000 Silver Honda Insight last friday. It's a 5-spd and has 45,000 miles on it. I have to wait a week before I can get tags though, so it's just sitting in my drive way. :( It's torture. :( At least I have it though.. :D. God I can't wait to get my tags.

What grade of gasoline do you guys use? 87, 89, 93?

One other thing. Does anyone know where I can get a new driverside sun visor? The mirror in it broken, and even though I probably won't use it, I want to go ahead and replace it.
 

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Honda recommends mid-grade. Regular tends to cause knocking, and premium cause the engine to run to hard. Also the higher the grade the longer it takes to burn the fuel.

Another factor is where you purchase your fuel. Yes all fuel is the same, but the additives, and water levels they use are not.
In this case BP/Amoco has the best fuel. Also, there premium fuel is clear which is actually the best fuel available, but with gas prices as high as they are I would recommend a mid-grade.
 
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Hi Arsenic1250:

___Whhoooaaa, hold on there. Honda recommends Regular unleaded (87 Octane here in the lower elevations/85 + in the higher ones), not Mid-grade (89 Octane here /87 + higher ones), nor Premium (91 Octane here/89 + higher up) for our Insight’s. This includes both the CVT and the higher compression 5-speed. If you hear knocking, your KS isn’t working nor should it have too given the Dyno charts showing a relatively smooth graph on Regular Unleaded from 0% to WOT before the T and HP drop off the cliff.

___Good Luck

___Wayne R. Gerdes
___Hunt Club Farms Landscaping Ltd.
___[email:1a842oxn][email protected][/email:1a842oxn]
 

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no they do not. The book says a minumal of regualr, along with every book to every car in america.

I hate to tell you regular fuel is the worst fuel on the market for any automotive that weights more than 907.18474 kilograms, the formula consists of just enough fuel to run any engine but is not going to keep it running in proper conditions.

The proper formula is F=mxa which will prove that an octane of 86 does not properaly generate enough forward force f1+f2+f3 with the engine giving the appropriate weight of more than 907.18474 kg of any vehicle. You need at least an octane of 89 to do so.
 

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Hi Mr. Arsenic; Actually Excel is correct. You are welcome to waste exta money on fuel if you desire, but regular unleaded is what Honda recommends, according to the owners manual. Many of us have driven close to 100K miles on regular. Over the last 16 years I have put 760,000 miles on Honda 4 and 3 clyinder cars, and I have always used regular. I feel you are misleading the original poster who raised the question.....Billy..
 

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Hi,

Real life usage is even better than human mathematics based on one's personal knowledge:
No one has been able to prove that high octane gives better gas mileage.

Simply, in real life, there is no difference between low, mid and high octane.
The car computer will prevent knocking and everything else.

You could even say that just by driving in a higher humidity environment (lets say, when it rains) the amount (%) of water in the air will act as a cooler to the combustion and therefore the gas will be similar to higher octane.

But nobody has seen the difference. I do not.

What I remember is that the different gas type "mid" was created only because when the leaded gas was removed, gas stations had an empty tank and nothing to put into it.

Reallity is high octane for specialty cars (Porches, Ferrari, ...) that need it and the lower cost gas for all other cars (like the Insight) as per the manufacturer request.
 

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We would need to look no further than the specifications for the Honda S2000 to find out that your statement, "The book says a minumal of regualr, along with every book to every car in america." is incorrect. I suspect additional evidence would be found in owners manuals for most manufacturers "super cars" Corvette, Porsche, BMW, etc.

Secondly, I doubt there is any "simple formula such as F=mxa" to prove how a specific octane rating will provide propulsion to an automobile. If so, please elaborate more on the variables contained in the above equation.

Lastly, you indicate that, " regular fuel is the worst fuel on the market for any automotive that weights more than 907.18474 kilograms" However, referencing the Insight Encyclopedia, I see that the maximum weight of the insight is 893Kg (for the CVT with air)...other trim levels weigh somewhat less. So even by your own admission, an Insight using regular gas doesn't fall into your worst fuel category.
 

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Since we're all going around about this, perhaps there is an opportunity to gain some insight (pun intended). I for one have no background in physics, but if Arsenic wouldn't mind dumbing it down for us it sounds like he may have some interesting info that would be worth considering. How 'bout it Mr. A.?
 

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Force equals mass times acceleration? What does that have to do with the anti-knock properties of gasoline? What does any of this have to do with being stupid?
 

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Here is a link from Chevron:

http://www.chevron.com/prodserv/fuels/b ... s_bull.pdf

In the box on page 7, they clearly state:

"Octane and Energy content are NOT related".

Basically, all automotive gasolines are going to have "Heating Values" within 2-3% of each other. That means that they are providing the same amount of energy per gallon. The intention of the octane rating is to describe the fuel's resistance to Autoignition. Unless your engine is knocking, buying higher octane fuel is a waste of money. If a particular modern engine has a higher compression ratio and calls for higher octane (like my '95 Maxima) and you use a lower octane, the knock sensor may cause the computer to retard the ignition timing and thus reduce the power output a bit. But clearly, Honda has designed the engine to operate on regular (87) octane and has written that in the owner's manual.

Conspiracy theorists take note: Both the auto company AND the oil company are telling you to use the least expensive gas.

Jim
 

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The way I understand gasoline, octane has two meanings. The first has to do with the particular molecule taken from the crude oil, that through the refining process, certain molecules in the oil have eight of the molecules (I apologize for not having the chemistry background to give the actual formula, but I believe octane is a chain of eight carbon-hydrogen molecules in a particular arrangement) that produce the specific chain of molecules that are commonly recognized as gasoline. Some amount of octane molecules occur naturally in oil, but through the refinining process, some larger chains are broken and some smaller chains are fused together to produce more gasoline from a barrel of crude oil than occurs naturally.

The second meaning is the one that it seems is the point of contention here, which is the octane definition concerning gasoline's resistance to detonation prior to occurance of a spark in the cylinder. The lower the octane, the lower pressure (and hence, tempurature) needed to cause detonation. But, as was stated earlier, with the complexity of engine management computers these days, I believe that the EMC can change the air/fuel mixture to ensure that there is not any "knock", or predetonation. As such, octane should have no direct correspondance to the amount of power contained within a given volume of gasoline's with differing octane ratings.

If the "octane" rating referred to the number of octane chains contained within a given volume of gasoline, as might be the case if discussing octane molecules, then I might think there could be a difference. And there might be differing formulae for various grades, but as far as the "pump octane" rating found on gas pumps, I'm pretty sure that it refers only to the resistance to detonation, and therefore should not make a difference to the engine in an Insight, except for how it affects the back pocket and how quickly it depletes the funding contained therein.
 

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Hi all and Arsenic,

As a moderator: In order to persue this tread about grade of gasoline, I will ask to be friendly and respectful. It is useless to be unkind, trolling or poisoning.

And the Insight user manual says: Unleaded gasoline, pump octane of 87 or higher
 

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Hi,

This tread is not going anywhere. The misinformation and trolling is clear. Tread is locked.
 
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