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I'm confused. This is what I ordered, here is a copy and paste from my invoice.

and I got the clear larger plastic part.

5872960 - Spring Detent Body * Black Professional Plastic 1 $7.88 5872961 - Light Pipe * Smoothest Fine Detail Plastic 1 $7.88

Value $4.99 Sub-Total $20.75 Discount -$0.00 Tax $1.84 Order Total $22.59

I paid $7.88 and 7.88.

I would get the light pipe in the Smoothest Fine Detail Plastic if you want it to be clear.

I did a bit of research into this at the time, forgot most of it now, but I came up with those choices based on that research. My total was only $22.59.
 

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@insightbuyer
I chose a process and material after reading through the descriptions and seeing the comparative prices.

It was the "high stiffness and dimensional stability" that persuaded me. (Of course, I'm hoping that doesn't include "highly brittle" too.)
 

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My part [sic] arrived today. A few days ago I received an email informing me I was being credited for half the order :^), but there was no mention they were dropping one of the two parts :^(.

It happened to be the smaller yoke. As there was no comment, I do not know why. (Maybe they ran out of filament...) If it's broken when I get in there which should be in the next day or two, I'm going to see if I can find a local with a printer. If it's not broken... maybe I should still find a local.
 

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I worked up the courage to try to peel the dash bezel off, and I followed Scott Kulbeck's great youtube vid closely. (I disagreed with "droppIng" the steering column, completely, and so only loosened the nuts to the farthest ends of their travel on the studs, which still left plenty of room to wiggle the bezel off.) (My conclusion is that the danger of cracking it is not as big as I thought. But then, I was doing it at 90 above, not 30 below...)

The most important part of his behavior that I tried emulated was Patience. (And committing the locations of the 3 easily overlooked screws to memory.)

After getting it loose, it was another 3-5 minutes of fussing with the electrical connectors. (I'd recommend starting on the passenger's side 3 which will create more room for dealing with the 3 on the driver's side which are in a tighter space.) After spudging the bottom free with the plastic spudger thing, I grasped the top of the bezel above the speedometer and wiggled it straight forward. There wasn't much resistance.

The switch assembly comes off the back of the bezel with three screws. I followed qwqeh(etc.)'s equally great youtube vid to dismantle it, again working patiently.

Turns out my yoke (the little "vee") was not broken, and although the longer transparent "light pipe" appeared to be fine at first glance, closer inspection revealed a hairline crack which caused the fingers to separate when pressed in one direction (up) instead of activating the switch. However, I had a friend who knocked out the parts on his 3d printer surprisingly quickly, although in cheapo ABS. I replaced the unbroken "vee"/yoke with mudder's sturdier (because the vee is supported by a column standing on the circuit board). The "vee" only serves as a "centering slide" to force the spring-loaded "nose" in the "light pipe" back to center. (That is, when the switch is operated, the nose is forced up one side or the other of the yoke, while one of the "fingers" on the light pipe operates the slide switch on the circuit board. When released, the spring causes the grease-covered nose to slide down the grease-covered yoke back to the bottom (which is also the center position of the switch).

I used my gray "glass-filled" part from Shapeways (the one piece they did make for me), and reassembled it. I had the whole dash back together in under 15 minutes after the switch module was reinstalled. Everything operates smoothly, but as at least one other has reported, it has a different feel but will work.

The bad news is that after driving it with the window in a partially-down-and-taped position for about seven months, the window motor has frozen up. It might only need "the tap treatment," but in any case the door panel has to come off. Scott's got that covered too.

I decided to put tiny hash-marks with Sharpie along the bottom edge of the bezel before re-installing it--to show me where I should pry if I have to do this again, but they also worked well for indicating where to "tap" the bezel for reinstallation.
 

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My motor was also frozen, when the switch goes it must force the window to constantly go up or down and cause the motor to burn out.

My switch doesn't have the same nice feel but it works, and has held up for a while now.

Does your auto-down work? That is when you press the button hard it goes all the way down by itself.
 

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My motor was also frozen, when the switch goes it must force the window to constantly go up or down and cause the motor to burn out.
You may be right, but my theory is that it might be that the contacts may have oxidized or corroded from sitting for so long.

My switch doesn't have the same nice feel but it works, and has held up for a while now.

Does your auto-down work? That is when you press the button hard it goes all the way down by itself.
It does. I studied the yoke (wish I'd studied the switch on the printed-circuit board more) and I couldn't see an obvious place on it where it went into a different mode, so I concluded that the switch must be a 4-position switch (as I recall someone else did). My window is frozen of course, but I can definitely tell there's a fourth position, the auto-down, there.
 
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